Hits and misses: How neuroscience can boost your creativity

Some say that great ideas come out of thin air. Neuroscientist David Eagleman posits that perhaps all great ideas are simply built upon old ideas, because thats what fuels the creative brain.

"All ideas have a genealogy," says David Eagleman. A writer, neuroscientist, and adjunct professor at Stanford University, he's definitely clued in to what makes ideas click. He posits that the brain craves something new so much that if you give someone the same thing over and over that after a certain amount of time you'll begin to see diminished returns in excitement. But sometimes "new" isn't necessarily new at all. He points out that although the iPhone is a revolutionary product it bears heavy similarity to an invention from IBM... from two decades ago. New ideas tend to be built upon similar ones, David Eagleman says, because "what we’re doing is building on the foundations of what has come before us." David's new book is The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes the World.

Understanding Creativity: Why Brain Hacks Don't Help

Everyone thinks they know how to make their brain more creative and have better ideas.

People think that their brain is like an iPhone — if they can just unlock it and press a few things in a certain order, then something is sure to happen. That's just not the case, as neuroscientist David Eagleman tells us. While some swear a cold shower helps them think better it's simply a matter of personal preference; what works for one might not work for anyone else. David has a great line: "You don’t have squirrels going to the moon or dogs inventing the internet or cows doing theater plays for one another or any of the gazillion things that we do." Quite frankly, what gets creatvity going the best is actually the most boring: a good diet and regular exercise... but where's the fun (and clickable headline) in that? David's new book is The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes the World.

Scientists Find Out How Hope Protects the Brain

Since hope appears to come from a physical place in the brain, scientists are hoping to figure out how it shields the rest of the brain from negativity. Really. 

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How loving-kindness meditation makes you healthier, happier, and kinder

Meditation is a lot more than just chilling out and reflecting. It can actually rewire your brain to become a better person.

If you've ever watched someone meditating it looks like they're just sitting there with their eyes closed. But what's going on in their head is extremely interesting: metta meditation (or 'loving-kindness' meditation if that's your thing) has been proven to actually make long-term practitioners certifiably better people. You might have to do it for 1,000 hours to see discernible effects in your brainwaves, but it's still fascinating news for those in the mediation field and indeed anyone interested in brain science. Daniel Goleman's new book is Primal Leadership: Unleashing the Power of Emotional Intelligence.

Science Is Starting to Explore the Gray Zone Between Life and Death

French researchers recently roused a patient out of a vegetative state. 

 

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We used to think of death as a moment. We reel when a beloved person meets a tragic end, be it in real life or our favorite show. The reality is, death is often a long, drawn out process that has to do with treatment, hospitals, and in the end, hospice care. Of course, it can strike suddenly too and without warning. But medical science has progressed to the point where we aren’t thinking of death so much as a moment anymore, but a process.

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