What Hope Actually Meant to Martin Luther King Jr.

Once upon a time, hope meant confronting suffering, not avoiding it. Have overly sugary connotations about hope diminished its true grit?

Here's an exercise: If there's someone near you right now, ask them to define hope. Quickly. What did they say: was it motivational? Did it deal with future ambition, expectation, and desire? Historically, hope has not always had such sugary connotations, and at one point—not so long ago, actually—it was more about confronting suffering in the present than mentally projecting yourself forward to a time where you have overcome your suffering. Drawing from an 1886 painting by George Frederic Watts called 'Hope', which inspired Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1959 sermon 'Shattered Dreams', Andre C. Willis presents a view of deep hope, a method of facing adversity that is woven together from the African American Protestant tradition.

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Does the U.S. Need to Choose Between Being Moral or Militaristic?

America has a split personality, and the country it wants to be is constantly being foiled by the country that it is. In an ideal world, says Jelani Cobb, there is a way of using power that does not entail the oppression and exploitation of other people. But how do we get there?

America operates on two kinds of power: moral authority – through which citizens and members of the international community invest in the United States’ message of a better future – and military might – the stark opposite of morality, whereby presidents overreach their authority and breach sovereign territory to meet their own objectives. Barack Obama represented the tension between these ideals, espousing morality in speech while engaging the US’s military might in action. The country America wants to be is constantly being foiled by the country that America is. Journalist Jelani Cobbs asks: can America have it both ways? Is it noble to try, or merely hypocritical? Jelani Cobb is a staff writer at The New Yorker. His latest book is The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress.

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Here's Why Comparing Executive Order Numbers Is a Waste of Time

Over the course of his presidency, Barack Obama issued a total of 276 executive orders. So, what exactly does that mean?

Pres. Obama signs an executive order to close Guantanamo Bay detention center. In his first week as president, Obama signed 5 executive orders. In Trump's first week, he's so far signed 5 orders and 1 notice – but there's really no point in comparing.

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Race Is More Than a Myth: It’s an Institutional Reality

Journalist Jelani Cobb considers the impact of Obama’s presidency on race in America. Did he make good on the promise of change that got him elected?

As President Obama leaves the White House, the post-mortems on his term and predictions on his legacy are starting to emerge. Particularly, what did Obama do for race politics in America – did he turn out to be the beacon hope liberals saw, or the expensive liability handing out reparations and redistributing power, as some conservatives feared?

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Edward Snowden’s First Reaction to Trump’s Election Is a Surprising One

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden told an audience we should not be "putting too much faith or fear elected officials." This includes Donald Trump.

Edward Snowden appeared via satellite on a live stream held by anonymous search engine StartPage.

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