Burger King designs meaty-cheesy horror burger to induce nightmares

It's "clinically proven" to induce nightmares, says Burger King, which ran a pretty weird study.

Photo: Burger King
  • Burger King has released a Halloween burger called the 'Nightmare King' it claims is "clinically proven to induce nightmares."
  • It ran a study in which 100 people ate a beef-chicken-bacon-cheese burger for 10 nights and had their REM monitored.
  • It's an obvious PR gimmick, but it highlights how little we know about the exact link between food and dreams.

If you're a fan of the podcast My Brother My Brother and Me, you'll be aware of a segment of the show called Munch Squad, which focuses on food and drink companies doing their best to get you interested in their particular product through the ever successful love language of press releases. This past Monday, Munch Squad focused on a burger put out by Burger King called the 'Nightmare King,' which Burger King claimed was clinically proven to give you nightmares, a claim it said was backed up by a study it ran with Paramount Trials and Florida Sleep & Neuro Diagnostic Services, in which 100 people were given a Nightmare King for dinner for 10 nights and observed while they slept. (Probably the real cause of any nightmares that occurred.) The study reported a 3.5 increase in nightmares due to a particular combination of protein and cheese. It's worth noting that the Burger King study has not been published in a peer-reviewed journal. Here – for those curious – are the contents of the burger:

... this spooky sandwich features ¼ lb* of savory flame – grilled beef, a 100% white meat crispy chicken fillet, melted American cheese, thick cut bacon, creamy mayonnaise, and onions all assembled on a glazed green sesame seed bun.

"According to previous studies, 4 percent of the population experiences nightmares in any given night," said the study's lead researcher and somnologist, Dr. Jose Gabriel Medina, in a statement. "But, after eating the Nightmare King, the data obtained from the study indicated that the incidence of nightmares increased by 3.5 times."

While there is little joy to be found in attaching a list of facts to a comedy podcast like a teacherly barnacle, it's worth making the point explicitly clear: there is no direct scientific proof that what you eat will have an impact on your dreams. A 2015 paper published by the Frontiers of Psychology that dug into this particular topic only found one study that even came close to getting at the subject, and it was a study featuring 7 men and 42 women which revealed that fast food may actually be linked to fewer nightmares:

... participants who expressed a preference for organic foods reported more frequent dream recall, recurring dreams and meaningful dreams, as well as more dreams containing particular themes such as flying, risk-taking, sex, and water. In contrast, participants who expressed a preference for fast foods reported less frequent dream recall, as well as fewer recurring dreams, nightmares, and sexual dreams.

Other attempts to examine the link between food and dreams have pursued a path simultaneously sublime and ridiculous. A 2005 study conducted by The British Cheese Board concluded that "eating Stilton cheese often led to crazy or vivid dreams while eating cheddar cheese often led to dreams of celebrities," though information available about the study is—in the paper's words—"extremely sparse."

There is something of a link between food deprivation and dreams. Five of fifteen individuals deprived of water for 24 hours in 1958 had a dream that "contained thirst-related content, but these did not depict the dreamer as thirsty or in the act of drinking." Individuals with eating disorders were found to have statistically higher reported incidents of dreaming about food. One study reported food dreams in 58% of patients with bulimia, 26% of patients with anorexia, and 44% of patients with anorexia and bulimia combined.

There's also something of a link between eating late and dreams, but—in the main—"Disturbing dreams [as opposed to what the paper calls 'vivid dreams'] were not, however, significantly related to the quality of participants' diets, having only a marginal positive correlation with drinking coffee."

And while a man named Hamburger once did work on looking at the link between food and dreams, there's little evidence that you can hold the other hamburger responsible. At best, it can be said that "food sensitivities and intolerances, especially lactose intolerance, could play a significant role in food-dependent dreaming." And that's about it.

A still from the film "We Became Fragments" by Luisa Conlon , Lacy Roberts and Hanna Miller, part of the Global Oneness Project library.

Photo: Luisa Conlon , Lacy Roberts and Hanna Miller / Global Oneness Project
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • Stories are at the heart of learning, writes Cleary Vaughan-Lee, Executive Director for the Global Oneness Project. They have always challenged us to think beyond ourselves, expanding our experience and revealing deep truths.
  • Vaughan-Lee explains 6 ways that storytelling can foster empathy and deliver powerful learning experiences.
  • Global Oneness Project is a free library of stories—containing short documentaries, photo essays, and essays—that each contain a companion lesson plan and learning activities for students so they can expand their experience of the world.
Keep reading Show less

Four philosophers who realized they were completely wrong about things

Philosophers like to present their works as if everything before it was wrong. Sometimes, they even say they have ended the need for more philosophy. So, what happens when somebody realizes they were mistaken?

Sartre and Wittgenstein realize they were mistaken. (Getty Images)
Culture & Religion

Sometimes philosophers are wrong and admitting that you could be wrong is a big part of being a real philosopher. While most philosophers make minor adjustments to their arguments to correct for mistakes, others make large shifts in their thinking. Here, we have four philosophers who went back on what they said earlier in often radical ways. 

Keep reading Show less

5 charts reveal key racial inequality gaps in the US

The inequalities impact everything from education to health.

ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs

America is experiencing some of its most widespread civil unrest in years following the death of George Floyd.

Keep reading Show less

Ask an astronomer: What makes neutron stars so special?

Astrophysicist Michelle Thaller talks ISS and why NICER is so important.

Michelle Thaller - Ask A Scientist - Nasa's NICER Mission FULL SCREENER
Videos
  • Being outside of Earth's atmosphere while also being able to look down on the planet is both a challenge and a unique benefit for astronauts conducting important and innovative experiments aboard the International Space Station.
  • NASA astrophysicist Michelle Thaller explains why one such project, known as NICER (Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer), is "one of the most amazing discoveries of the last year."
  • Researchers used x-ray light data from NICER to map the surface of neutrons (the spinning remnants of dead stars 10-50 times the mass of our sun). Thaller explains how this data can be used to create a clock more accurate than any on Earth, as well as a GPS device that can be used anywhere in the galaxy.
Scroll down to load more…