A Map to the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine

Up to 8,000 people each year go hunting for a legendary gold mine, guided by cryptic maps like these.

A Map to the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine

The Superstition Mountains to the east of Phoenix, AZ reportedly hold a legendary motherlode of gold known as the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine. Through the years, truth and fiction about this mine have been irrevokably mixed up, producing 62 varieties of the legend. Before we get into those, here are some genuine facts about the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine:


  • There really was a Lost Dutchman, although he wasn’t Dutch. Jakob Waltz was nicknamed Dutch (i.e. from the Netherlands) because he was Deutsch (i.e. from Germany; a common error, see also ‘Pennsylvania Dutch’). A man of that name was born in Württemberg in 1810 and emigrated to the U.S. From the 1860s onward, he homesteaded in Arizona, pursuing mining and prospecting as a hobby – a quite unsuccessful one.  Waltz fell ill and died in 1891, but not before revealing the location of an alleged gold mine to Julia Thomas, the neighbour who cared for him. As early as Sept 1, 1892, a local newspaper relates how Thomas and others were trying to locate the mine. When they failed, it is reported they sold copies of a map for $7 each. After about a decade, the story sank into obscurity, regaining notoriety when it had acquired more spectacular aspects, in a fashion not dissimilar to a game of Chinese whispers.

  • The Lost Dutchman Mine is the most famous in American history. Quite literally so, according to Southwestern Folklore author and researcher Byrd Granger. In 1977, Granger noted that the Lost Dutchman story was printed at least 6 times more often than the story of Captain Kidd’s lost treasure or the story of the Lost Pegleg Mine in California.

  • The Lost Dutchman Mine is also the most sought after in American history. Attempts have been made to locate it at least since 1892. Some 8,000 people each year try to find it. And not just crackpots: former attorney general of Arizona Bob Corbin was one of the many mine-seekers.

  • The Lost Dutchman Gold Mine has been situated in four quite distinct locales. It has been looked for in Colorado, California and in two places in Arizona – the other one being near Wickenburg, 180 km north-west of the Superstition Mountains.
  • Granger distinguished three main elements to the story, with the most complete version of the story incorporating all three legends. He argued that each of these three legends contains some truth, but have become badly distorted through time. The legend continues to evolve: recent additions are versions in which the gold is really a secret treasure trove of the Knights of the Golden Circle, a Confederate secret society active during the American Civil War (1861-1864).

    A cryptic map of the gold mine, or just a fake?  

  • Tales of the lost Apache’s gold, or Dr Thorne’s mine. The Apache (some even mention their famous chief Geronimo in this respect) are the only ones who know of a very rich gold mine in the Superstition Mountains. That is, until Miguel Peralta’s family stumbles upon the site and start mining the gold. They are massacred by the Apache in 1850. Years later, an army doctor by the name of Thorne treats an ailing Apache (possibly a chief) who as a reward takes him to the mine – blindfolded, of course – where he can take as much gold as he can carry. Thorne is later unable or unwilling to reveal the location of the mine. Some writers have indicated that there actually was a Miguel Peralta whose family operated a gold mine – but this was in the 1860s, near Valenciana in California. After the mine became unprofitable, Miguel Peralta turned to fraud. He sold the mining rights to a large area in southern Arizona and New Mexico to Dr George M. Willing, Jr., based on a deed originally granted by the Spanish Empire. The deed was bogus, and Willing never recovered his money. This might be the way the Peralta story became incorporated into the Lost Dutchman legend. Additionally, there never was an army doctor named Thorne in the 1860s in Arizona. There was a Dr Thorne who had a private practice in New Mexico, however. He claimed to have been abducted by Navajo in 1854, discovering a rich gold vein during his captivity. Thorne told his story to three solders in 1858, upon which the soldiers unsuccessfully set out to find the vein.
  • Tales of the Lost Dutchman. This story involves Jakob Waltz (some sources say Weitz, Weitzer, Walls, Welz,…) and another German named Jakob Weiser – although this second German probably is a ‘spin-off’ of the first Jakob, which occurred in the re-telling of the story. There are ‘hawk’ and ‘dove’ versions, depending on whether the men behaved violently or not. The story goes something like this: Waltz and/or Weiser locate a rich gold mine in the Superstition Mountains (in some versions they are told the location by a grateful member of the Peralta family, whose life they saved). Weiser is attacked (either by Apache or by Waltz) but survives long enough to tell a Dr Walker about the mine. Waltz also makes a deathbed confession to a Julia Thomas, and even draws a crude map of the mine.
  • Stories of the soldiers’ lost gold vein. Around 1870, two U.S. Army soldiers discover a vein of almost pure gold in or near the Superstition Mountains, are able to present some of it to a third party but afterwards are killed or vanish. The root of this story is the effort of three US soldiers to locate gold in New Mexico based on what Dr Thorne allegedly told them.

    True or not, the legend of the Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine continues to fascinate the public. This post card is a humourous version of the many serious treasure maps that undoubtedly circulated in Arizona and environs at the height of gold mine fever, at the end of the 19th century.

    Strange Maps #63

    Got a strange map? Let me know at strangemaps@gmail.com.

    This is what aliens would 'hear' if they flew by Earth

    A Mercury-bound spacecraft's noisy flyby of our home planet.

    Image source: sdecoret on Shutterstock/ESA/Big Think
    Surprising Science
    • There is no sound in space, but if there was, this is what it might sound like passing by Earth.
    • A spacecraft bound for Mercury recorded data while swinging around our planet, and that data was converted into sound.
    • Yes, in space no one can hear you scream, but this is still some chill stuff.

    First off, let's be clear what we mean by "hear" here. (Here, here!)

    Sound, as we know it, requires air. What our ears capture is actually oscillating waves of fluctuating air pressure. Cilia, fibers in our ears, respond to these fluctuations by firing off corresponding clusters of tones at different pitches to our brains. This is what we perceive as sound.

    All of which is to say, sound requires air, and space is notoriously void of that. So, in terms of human-perceivable sound, it's silent out there. Nonetheless, there can be cyclical events in space — such as oscillating values in streams of captured data — that can be mapped to pitches, and thus made audible.

    BepiColombo

    Image source: European Space Agency

    The European Space Agency's BepiColombo spacecraft took off from Kourou, French Guyana on October 20, 2019, on its way to Mercury. To reduce its speed for the proper trajectory to Mercury, BepiColombo executed a "gravity-assist flyby," slinging itself around the Earth before leaving home. Over the course of its 34-minute flyby, its two data recorders captured five data sets that Italy's National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) enhanced and converted into sound waves.

    Into and out of Earth's shadow

    In April, BepiColombo began its closest approach to Earth, ranging from 256,393 kilometers (159,315 miles) to 129,488 kilometers (80,460 miles) away. The audio above starts as BepiColombo begins to sneak into the Earth's shadow facing away from the sun.

    The data was captured by BepiColombo's Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) instrument. Says Carmelo Magnafico of the ISA team, "When the spacecraft enters the shadow and the force of the Sun disappears, we can hear a slight vibration. The solar panels, previously flexed by the Sun, then find a new balance. Upon exiting the shadow, we can hear the effect again."

    In addition to making for some cool sounds, the phenomenon allowed the ISA team to confirm just how sensitive their instrument is. "This is an extraordinary situation," says Carmelo. "Since we started the cruise, we have only been in direct sunshine, so we did not have the possibility to check effectively whether our instrument is measuring the variations of the force of the sunlight."

    When the craft arrives at Mercury, the ISA will be tasked with studying the planets gravity.

    Magentosphere melody

    The second clip is derived from data captured by BepiColombo's MPO-MAG magnetometer, AKA MERMAG, as the craft traveled through Earth's magnetosphere, the area surrounding the planet that's determined by the its magnetic field.

    BepiColombo eventually entered the hellish mangentosheath, the region battered by cosmic plasma from the sun before the craft passed into the relatively peaceful magentopause that marks the transition between the magnetosphere and Earth's own magnetic field.

    MERMAG will map Mercury's magnetosphere, as well as the magnetic state of the planet's interior. As a secondary objective, it will assess the interaction of the solar wind, Mercury's magnetic field, and the planet, analyzing the dynamics of the magnetosphere and its interaction with Mercury.

    Recording session over, BepiColombo is now slipping through space silently with its arrival at Mercury planned for 2025.

    Learn the Netflix model of high-performing teams

    Erin Meyer explains the keeper test and how it can make or break a team.

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    • There are numerous strategies for building and maintaining a high-performing team, but unfortunately they are not plug-and-play. What works for some companies will not necessarily work for others. Erin Meyer, co-author of No Rules Rules: Netflix and the Culture of Reinvention, shares one alternative employed by one of the largest tech and media services companies in the world.
    • Instead of the 'Rank and Yank' method once used by GE, Meyer explains how Netflix managers use the 'keeper test' to determine if employees are crucial pieces of the larger team and are worth fighting to keep.
    • "An individual performance problem is a systemic problem that impacts the entire team," she says. This is a valuable lesson that could determine whether the team fails or whether an organization advances to the next level.
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