102 - Exclaves of West Berlin (2): Laßzinswiesen

soviet_lasszinswiesen.jpg

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Not much info on this, the third (*) of former West Berlin’s ten tiny enclaves within former East Germany. This website on Berlin exclaves merely mentions that Laßzinswiesen “was an exclave just north of Laßzinssee, only tens of meters from West-Berlin but completely unaccessible from the West.” As is shown on this Soviet map. The text inside the exclave contains the words ‘perechod’ (‘access’) and ‘granitsa’ (‘border’), but that’s where my acquaintance with Russian ends. Any help with the translation would be very welcome.


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Other sources list Lasszinswiesen as having an area of 13,49 hectares, making it the third largest of West Berlin’s exclaves. For a complete list of the exclaves and their sizes, go here. All territorial anomalies between West Berlin and East Germany (except West Berlin – or East Germany – itself) were resolved in three stages of Gebietsaustausch (exchange of territory) in 1971, 1974 and 1988. The Wall fell just a year after the last exchange.

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(*): See post #99 for a map and some information on Erlengrund and Fichtewiese, the first two exclaves mentioned on this blog.

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