Should the Democrats Keep Pelosi?

In the wake of losing at least 60 seats in the House—their largest defeat in 70 years—there have been widespread calls for currrent Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) to step down from her leadership position in the Democratic caucus. Republicans had urged voters to get to the polls to “Fire Pelosi.” Now that the Democrats have lost their majority in the House and Pelosi has to step down as speaker, Republican Whip Eric Cantor (R-VA) says that if Pelosi stays on as Minority Leader it will be a sign that Democrats “just didn’t get the message from the voters this election.” In an editorial Sunday, The New York Times agreed that the Democrats need someone who can do a better job of selling their policies. Conservative Blue Dog Democrat Heath Shuler (D-NC)—who is interested in the post for himself—has also suggested that it is “time to move forward in a different direction.”


Pelosi is nationally very unpopular. Just two weeks before the election, Gallup found that just 29% of Americans approved of the job she was doing. The New York Times is right to suggest that she is not as gifted a spokesperson as she is an inside political player. And being from notoriously liberal San Francisco does make her especially vulnerable to political attacks. But a lot of her unpopularity comes with the job. As ranking Democrat in Congress and the primary force behind health care reform, she made a lot of enemies and became the major target of Republican attacks. Part of the reason that Pelosi—arguably one of the most effective Speakers in American history—is so hated by conservatives is that she managed to get so much legislation passed that they opposed. Pelosi was also targeted by a record-breaking $65 million advertising campaign—involving more than 160,000 ads—making her the face of everything wrong with Democratic Party. Nor should it be any surprise that the highest-ranking female politician in American history should be subject to vitriolic and often sexist attacks.

As unpopular as Pelosi may be, it’s not her fault the Democrats took such a beating in last week’s elections. She’s not the reason the economy continues to falter. Nor is she the reason Congress has been so dysfunctional. As I have argued, the real problems lay in the Senate, although it’s House Democrats who paid the major price for partisan infighting. And, as I have written, the Democrats were never likely to hold on to the seats in normally Republican districts they won in 2008 in with Obama on the ballot.

Pelosi’s unpopularity may make her an easy target, but Heath Shuler would be subject to the same kind of attacks if he took her job. In any case, the Minority Leader’s job is not primarily to be a spokesperson, but to build and hold together legislative coalitions. That’s exactly what Pelosi, who doesn’t sound like she is ready to step down, knows how to do. The Democrats are going to need her expertise in the next Congress, when the new Republican majority in the House maneuvers to cut off funding to Democratic programs and undermine the last Congress' accomplishments. As Greg Sargent says, “the key thing to understand is that we are about to enter a period of bruising procedural wars—precisely the type of thing that Pelosi has already excelled at.”

Lateral thinking: How to workshop innovative ideas

Don't underestimate the power of play when it comes to problem-solving.

Videos
  • As we get older, the work we consistently do builds "rivers of thinking." These give us a rich knowledge of a certain kind of area.
  • The problem with this, however, is that as those patterns get deeper, we get locked into them. When this happens it becomes a challenge to think differently — to break from the past and generate new ideas.
  • How do we get out of this rut? One way is to bring play and game mechanics into workshops. When we approach problem-solving from a perspective of fun, we lose our fear of failure, allowing us to think boldly and overcome built patterns.

Are these 100 people killing the planet?

Controversial map names CEOs of 100 companies producing 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.

Image: Jordan Engel, reused via Decolonial Media License 0.1
Strange Maps
  • Just 100 companies produce 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gases.
  • This map lists their names and locations, and their CEOs.
  • The climate crisis may be too complex for these 100 people to solve, but naming and shaming them is a good start.
Keep reading Show less

Straight millennials are becoming less accepting of LGBTQ people

The surprising results come from a new GLAAD survey.

Photo credit: Clem Onojeghuo on Unsplash
Culture & Religion
  • The survey found that 18- to 34-year-old non-LGBTQ Americans reported feeling less comfortable around LGBTQ people in a variety of hypothetical situations.
  • The attitudes of older non-LGBTQ Americans have remained basically constant over the past few years.
  • Overall, about 80 percent of Americans support equal rights for LGBTQ people.
Keep reading Show less