Why Dogs Are Smarter Than Cats

Being sociable has its advantages—across more than 500 mammal species, animals that lived in social groups had bigger brains than those that lived by themselves.

Evolutionary biologists had long assumed brain size increased in mammals in a more or less consistent fashion, with each species gaining roughly the same boost relative to body size over time. However, Oxford researchers Dr. Susanne Shultz and Professor Robin Dunbar have revealed in their new study that the truth is a bit more complicated, and it's actually the sociability of a given species that determines brain size. Unsurprisingly, primate brains grew the most over time, followed by horses, dolphins, camels, and dogs. All these creatures tend to live in stable social groups. Solitary mammals, including everything from cats to rhinos, showed much slower brain size growth over the same evolutionary period.

Scientists claim the Bible is written in code that predicts future events

The controversy around the Torah codes gets a new life.

Michael Drosnin
Surprising Science
  • Mathematicians claim to see a predictive pattern in the ancient Torah texts.
  • The code is revealed by a method found with special computer software.
  • Some events described by reading the code took place after the code was written.
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How to split the USA into two countries: Red and Blue

Progressive America would be half as big, but twice as populated as its conservative twin.

Image: Dicken Schrader
Strange Maps
  • America's two political tribes have consolidated into 'red' and 'blue' nations, with seemingly irreconcilable differences.
  • Perhaps the best way to stop the infighting is to go for a divorce and give the two nations a country each
  • Based on the UN's partition plan for Israel/Palestine, this proposal provides territorial contiguity and sea access to both 'red' and 'blue' America
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Orangutans exhibit awareness of the past

Orangutans join humans and bees in a very exclusive club

(Eugene Sim/Shutterstock)
Surprising Science
  • Orangutan mothers wait to sound a danger alarm to avoid tipping off predators to their location
  • It took a couple of researchers crawling around the Sumatran jungle to discover the phenomenon
  • This ability may come from a common ancestor
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