Weakened Warriors?

A gay US Marine has written a tongue-in-cheek editorial in the New Yorker asserting that the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy on homosexuality makes him a better soldier.

General Merril A. McPeak, former Air Force Chief of Staff remarked in the Op-Ed pages of the Times: "I do not see how permitting open homosexuality in these communities enhances their prospects of success in battle. Indeed, I believe repealing ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ will weaken the warrior culture at a time when we have a fight on our hands." In response, a gay US Marine, writing under the name Marine Corporal Roger T., said he wholeheartedly agreed with McPeak’s sentiments and that being closeted actually "makes me a better soldier, through what I term sublimation." He continues: "Right before heading out into a firefight with Iraqi insurgents, I always imagine myself at the beach with Merrill A. McPeak, both of us in helmets, camouflage-print Speedos, combat boots, and sunglasses. I picture myself rubbing sunblock all over the luscious, leathery hide of General McPeak, and the adrenaline rockets through my veins, and by the time I leave the Green Zone I’m ready to kill anything that moves, and then make savage, passionate love to its corpse. I’m at what I like to call my sensual, combat-ready McPeak."

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