[VIDEO] There is Liquid Water Flowing Right Now on Mars

In a press conference this morning at 11:30 am Eastern time, NASA scientists confirmed the presence of liquid water on Mars.

In a press conference this morning at 11:30 am Eastern time, NASA scientists confirmed the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) found liquid water on Mars, as evidenced by mineral streaks on the surface that ebb, flow, and change color over time. 


After years of methodical study, researchers noticed dark streaks appearing on the slopes of Mars. These streaks seemed to ebb and flow during the warmer seasons on the red planet, indicating water.

From NASA's press release:

“Our quest on Mars has been to ‘follow the water,’ in our search for life in the universe, and now we have convincing science that validates what we’ve long suspected,” said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

“It took multiple spacecraft over several years to solve this mystery, and now we know there is liquid water on the surface of this cold, desert planet,” said Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA’s Mars Exploration Program at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “It seems that the more we study Mars, the more we learn how life could be supported and where there are resources to support life in the future.” 

“This is a significant development, as it appears to confirm that water — albeit briny — is flowing today on the surface of Mars.” This development means these could be resources that benefit future expeditions. The water itself is pretty salty, saltier than the world's oceans, according to scientist Alfred McEwen. The researchers estimate at least 100,000 cubic meters of water. But it's wet soil, rather than standing water, which means researchers will have to develop ways to extract it from the ground.

However, it seems NASA's researchers are already on it — developing some "MacGyver" solutions to prepare for a Mars mission.

Russia sends its first android to space

The Russian-built FEDOR was launched on a mission to help ISS astronauts.

Photos by TASS\TASS via Getty Images
Technology & Innovation
  • Russia launched a spacecraft carrying FEDOR, a humanoid robot.
  • Its mission is to help astronauts aboard the International Space Station.
  • Such androids can eventually help with dangerous missions likes spacewalks.
Keep reading Show less

Human extinction! Don't panic; think about it like a philosopher.

Most people think human extinction would be bad. These people aren't philosophers.

Shutterstock
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new opinion piece in The New York Times argues that humanity is so horrible to other forms of life that our extinction wouldn't be all that bad, morally speaking.
  • The author, Dr. Todd May, is a philosopher who is known for advising the writers of The Good Place.
  • The idea of human extinction is a big one, with lots of disagreement on its moral value.
Keep reading Show less

this incredibly rich machinery – with Antonio Damasio

Picking up where we left off a year ago, a conversation about the homeostatic imperative as it plays out in everything from bacteria to pharmaceutical companies—and how the marvelous apparatus of the human mind also gets us into all kinds of trouble.

Think Again Podcasts
  • "Prior to nervous systems: no mind, no consciousness, no intention in the full sense of the term. After nervous systems, gradually we ascend to this possibility of having to this possibility of having minds, having consciousness, and having reasoning that allows us to arrive at some of these very interesting decisions."
  • "We are fragile culturally and socially…but life is fragile to begin with. All that it takes is a little bit of bad luck in the management of those supports, and you're cooked…you can actually be cooked—with global warming!"



Keep reading Show less