The Science of Attraction

"What makes some people so much more alluring than others? The Independent discovers that good looks and sexiness are determined before we're even born."

"Why are some people seen as attractive and others not? And why have we evolved to find some features attractive and others not? According to new research, it may all be down to oxidative stress and antioxidants. Psychologists have discovered that men who were rated as the most physically attractive by women have the lowest levels of markers of oxidative stress. 'These findings have several important implications,' says psychologist Dr Steven Gangestad who led the study. 'They fit in with the idea that women evolved to find particular features attractive because those features are related to low levels of oxidative stress.'"

A Magnetotail Around Mars Would Cause the Planet to Terraform Itself

Imagine the birth of an entirely new ocean on the Martian surface. 

 

Artist rendition of a terraformed Mars. Flickr.
Technology & Innovation

There are lots of arguments for exploring space and colonizing other planets. Exploration is a natural part of our species. The knowledge we gain is bound to propel our scientific understanding and capabilities. And admittedly, there are plenty of commercial reasons too. Plus, sooner or later, the Earth is going to die out. To survive, we’ll have to become an interplanetary species.

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The future of humanity: can we avert disaster?

Climate change and artificial intelligence pose substantial — and possibly existential — problems for humanity to solve. Can we?

Credit: stokkete / 223237936 via Adobe Stock
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  • Just by living our day-to-day lives, we are walking into a disaster.
  • Can humanity wake up to avert disaster?
  • Perhaps COVID was the wake-up call we all needed.
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Genetics of unexplained sudden cardiac arrest

New research shines a light on the genetics of sudden cardiac deaths.

Photo: Pixel-Shot / Adobe Stock
Surprising Science
  • Soccer player Christian Eriksen of Denmark recently collapsed on the field from a cardiac arrest. Thankfully, he survived.
  • A new study examined the genetics underlying unexplained sudden cardiac death.
  • About 20 percent of these unexplained deaths are likely due to genetics.
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Technology & Innovation

Finally, a scientific cure for the hiccups

A new device cured the hiccups 92 percent of the time in a recent study involving more than 200 participants.

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