Rajahnthon’s Law

The death of one-month-old Rajahnthon Haynie, whose body was found in Druid Hill Park in Baltimore on Sunday, begs the age-old question: How can child abuse be stopped?

The death of one-month-old Rajahnthon Haynie, whose body was found in Druid Hill Park in Baltimore on Sunday, is just another incidence of violence against children which begs the age-old question: How can child abuse be stopped? Peter Jensen of the Baltimore Sun writes that in a peculiar twist of fate, a law recently approved by the General Assembly should provide provision against such horrors occurring in future. Last year the state authorities approved a law that makes it paramount that the health department notify the Social Services Administration when a mother whose parental rights have been taken away gives birth to another child. This law could have save little Rajahnthon as the infant’s 28-tear-old mother, who has been charged with first degree murder, had a history of child endangerment and had had her previous four children taken away by social services. But the change in the law that might have safeguarded Rajahnthon had been pushed back over concerns that about privacy and maternal rights. Jensen says that with the economic downturn putting more and more children at risk of abuse, it is time to take whatever measures to prevent it.

How to make time for exercise — even on your craziest days

A new study shows choosing to be active is a lot of work for our brains. Here are some ways to make it easier.

Personal Growth

There's no shortage of science suggesting that exercise is good for your mental as well as your physical health — and yet for many of us, incorporating exercise into our daily routines remains a struggle. A new study, published in the journal Neuropsychologia, asks why. Shouldn't it be easier to take on a habit that is so good for us?

Keep reading Show less

Juice is terrible for children. Why do we keep giving it to them?

A glass of juice has as much sugar, ounce for ounce, as a full-calorie soda. And those vitamins do almost nothing.

Pixabay user Stocksnap
popular

Quick: think back to childhood (if you've reached the scary clown you've gone too far). What did your parents or guardians give you to keep you quiet? If you're anything like most parents, it was juice. But here's the thing: juice is bad for you. 

Keep reading Show less

Why American history lives between the cracks

The stories we tell define history. So who gets the mic in America?

Videos
  • History is written by lions. But it's also recorded by lambs.
  • In order to understand American history, we need to look at the events of the past as more prismatic than the narrative given to us in high school textbooks.
  • Including different voices can paint a more full and vibrant portrait of America. Which is why more walks of American life can and should be storytellers.
Keep reading Show less