One Reason Why Male Nurses And Teachers Are Good Catches

A new study states that men who work in female-dominated professions perform 25 percent more chores than those who work in male-dominated professions.

What's the Latest Development?


A Notre Dame study of heterosexual couples, using US Census data spanning almost 30 years, reveals that men who work in occupations that are traditionally considered female -- nursing, teaching, hairstyling, and the like -- will do 25 percent more household chores than men who work in male-dominated fields like engineering. Interestingly, women in women-dominated fields do 14 percent more chores than women in traditionally male occupations, but if their spouse or partner switches from a "male" job to a "female" job, they will reduce the number of chores they do.

What's the Big Idea?

In a paper presented at the American Sociological Association this week, Notre Dame sociology professor Elizabeth Aura McClintock wrote that simply by working in a female-dominated environment, men's attitudes towards housework may shift towards greater awareness and empathy. Another observation was that the amount of non-work time affected who did more chores: "Men will increase their household tasks a bit when their wife works more hours, and they’ll reduce them when they collect a lot of overtime." 

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

Read it at Quartz

Related Articles

Why the world needs death to prosper

Scientists have developed new ways of understanding how the biological forces of death drive important life processes.

Surprising Science
  • Researchers have found new ways on how decomposing plants and animals contribute to the life cycle.
  • After a freak mass herd death of 300 reindeer, scientists were able to study a wide range of the decomposition processes.
  • Promoting the necrobiome research will open up new areas of inquiry and even commerce.
Keep reading Show less

Why birds fly south for the winter—and more about bird migration

What do we see from watching birds move across the country?

E. Fleischer
Surprising Science
  • A total of eight billion birds migrate across the U.S. in the fall.
  • The birds who migrate to the tropics fair better than the birds who winter in the U.S.
  • Conservationists can arguably use these numbers to encourage the development of better habitats in the U.S., especially if temperatures begin to vary in the south.
Keep reading Show less

How does alcohol affect your brain?

Explore how alcohol affects your brain, from the first sip at the bar to life-long drinking habits.

(Photo by Angie Garrett/Wikimedia Commons)
Mind & Brain
  • Alcohol is the world's most popular drug and has been a part of human culture for at least 9,000 years.
  • Alcohol's effects on the brain range from temporarily limiting mental activity to sustained brain damage, depending on levels consumed and frequency of use.
  • Understanding how alcohol affects your brain can help you determine what drinking habits are best for you.
Keep reading Show less