Men's Wearhouse Founder Aims For Disruption, Launches 'Uber for Tailors'

George Zimmer, famous for his familiar beard and iconic commercial catchphrase, is attempting to disrupt the tailoring industry with a new venture.

If you ever watched television between 1985 and 2013, you're probably familiar with George Zimmer, the bearded, gravel-voiced founder of Men's Wearhouse who was loudly ousted from the company two years ago. In the time since his departure, Zimmer has been hard at work fashioning on a comeback. According to David Gelles of The New York Times, that comeback is nigh — and it's got a technological twist:


"On Monday, he will unveil his new company, zTailors, a website and app that connects customers and their frumpy wardrobes with on-demand tailors who are ready to make house calls.

“It’s Uber for tailors,” Mr. Zimmer, 66, said in an interview.

Backing the nascent company with his own money, Mr. Zimmer says he believes that zTailors — yes, the “z” is for Zimmer — has the potential to transform millions of ill-fitting garments into like-new items.

Its app and website allow customers to schedule a tailor to come to their homes or offices, where they will measure and refit suits, shirts, jackets, and dresses for a set price. The altered items are then returned in a few days."

Will zTailors succeed? The odds could be in Zimmer's favor, especially if we use the "mattress test" described in the video below by venture capitalist Ben Lerer:

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