Hybrid Solar-Pedal Vehicle Now In Production

Organic Transit's ELF is a single-seat three-wheeler that is a cross between a bicycle and an electric car. They could start appearing in bike lanes in a matter of months.

What's the Latest Development?


North Carolina-based Organic Transit has begun production of ELF, a hybrid three-wheeled vehicle that can be powered either by pedaling or by a 480-watt battery that gets its energy from solar panels installed on the top. The first models are going out to the project backers, who helped raise 225 percent of the initial $100,000 asked for in a Kickstarter campaign last November. The base model goes for $4,000, and at current production rates, the company says that an ELF ordered now could be on the road by this summer.

What's the Big Idea?

The ELF can travel up to 30 miles, at speeds of up to 20 miles per hour, on a single battery charge alone, which classifies it as a bicycle according to federal guidelines. It fits comfortably inside a bike lane, yet it has headlights, tail lights, turn signals, and other items commonly found on a car. The company's Web site says it represents the best of both worlds: "Stay fresh for work by using the electric motor on your morning commute...Skip the gym and still find time for a daily workout as you pedal home."

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

Read it at Digital Trends

Related Articles

Why Japan's hikikomori isolate themselves from others for years

These modern-day hermits can sometimes spend decades without ever leaving their apartments.

700,000 Japanese people are thought to be hikikomori, modern-day hermits who never leave their apartments (BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images).
Mind & Brain
  • A hikikomori is a type of person in Japan who locks themselves away in their bedrooms, sometimes for years.
  • This is a relatively new phenomenon in Japan, likely due to rigid social customs and high expectations for academic and business success.
  • Many believe hikikomori to be a result of how Japan interprets and handles mental health issues.
Keep reading Show less

Scientists discover what caused the worst mass extinction ever

How a cataclysm worse than what killed the dinosaurs destroyed 90 percent of all life on Earth.

Credit: Ron Miller
Surprising Science

While the demise of the dinosaurs gets more attention as far as mass extinctions go, an even more disastrous event called "the Great Dying” or the “End-Permian Extinction” happened on Earth prior to that. Now scientists discovered how this cataclysm, which took place about 250 million years ago, managed to kill off more than 90 percent of all life on the planet.

Keep reading Show less

Why we're so self-critical of ourselves after meeting someone new

A new study discovers the “liking gap” — the difference between how we view others we’re meeting for the first time, and the way we think they’re seeing us.

New acquaintances probably like you more than you think. (Photo by Simone Joyner/Getty Images)
Surprising Science

We tend to be defensive socially. When we meet new people, we’re often concerned with how we’re coming off. Our anxiety causes us to be so concerned with the impression we’re creating that we fail to notice that the same is true of the other person as well. A new study led by Erica J. Boothby, published on September 5 in Psychological Science, reveals how people tend to like us more in first encounters than we’d ever suspect.

Keep reading Show less