Do We Really Need to Take Our Vitamins?

Couldn't we just get all the nutrients we need from food?


We are a nation obsessed with vitamins, says Catherine Price, author of Vitamania: Our Obsessive Quest For Nutritional Perfection. Despite what Dr. Oz may say, there is no magic pill; vitamins are not the all-in-one wellness solution they've been made out to be.

“Most of the things we take vitamins for don’t have much evidence behind them,” she said in an interview with PRI. “There isn’t convincing [research] showing that multivitamins will do much beyond healing serious deficiency diseases.”

Vitamins are important for nutrition, which prevent us from getting horrible diseases, like scurvy. But taking a pill to compensate for nutritional imbalance is a thing of the past--we have all the nutrition we need in our food, even our chips are enriched with nutrients. The trouble starts when consumers believe the "additional benefits" their supplemental vitamins provide. "Vitamin B12--it boosts cognition!" a label might say, but the research shows that's nothing more than snake-oil salesmanship. But the worst cases are when the ingredients listed on the "Supplement Facts" aren't even in the bottle, which is what the New York attorney general's office found out earlier this year.

The New York Times reported on a series of herbal supplements sold by GNC, Target, Walgreens, and Walmart--all put under scientific review. The researchers found what was in these little capsules was far from what the label on the bottle claimed. Some even contained traces of peanuts and soybeans, which could cause harmful allergic reactions.

So, how can people pushing these supplements get away with this false labeling? Well, according to the FDA's website, it has little control over the issue. It notes that “unlike drug products that must be proven safe and effective for their intended use before marketing, there are no provisions in the law for FDA to ‘approve’ dietary supplements ... before they reach the consumer.”

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver did a great deep dive into the topic. Skip forward to 5:20 to get to the meatier part of the story. (Warning: There is some use of strong language that some may find objectionable.)

Some supplements may very well contain what they advertise, but are they really necessary? Price says we may be over-thinking our nutritional needs.

She explains:

“If you’re worried about getting adequate nutrients, look at your diet. Just make sure you get some orange juice once in a while.”

Read more about Price's assessment of our vitamin-crazed culture at PRI.

Photo Credit: JEAN-CHRISTOPHE VERHAEGEN / Stringer/ Getty

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

4 reasons Martin Luther King, Jr. fought for universal basic income

In his final years, Martin Luther King, Jr. become increasingly focused on the problem of poverty in America.

(Photo by J. Wilds/Keystone/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Despite being widely known for his leadership role in the American civil rights movement, Martin Luther King, Jr. also played a central role in organizing the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.
  • The campaign was one of the first to demand a guaranteed income for all poor families in America.
  • Today, the idea of a universal basic income is increasingly popular, and King's arguments in support of the policy still make a good case some 50 years later.
Keep reading Show less

A world map of Virgin Mary apparitions

She met mere mortals with and without the Vatican's approval.

Strange Maps
  • For centuries, the Virgin Mary has appeared to the faithful, requesting devotion and promising comfort.
  • These maps show the geography of Marian apparitions – the handful approved by the Vatican, and many others.
  • Historically, Europe is where most apparitions have been reported, but the U.S. is pretty fertile ground too.
Keep reading Show less

Why I wear my life on my skin

For Damien Echols, tattoos are part of his existential armor.

Videos
  • In prison Damien Echols was known by his number SK931, not his name, and had his hair sheared off. Stripped of his identity, the only thing he had left was his skin.
  • This is why he began tattooing things that are meaningful to him — to carry a "suit of armor" made up the images of the people and objects that have significance to him, from his friends to talismans.
  • Echols believes that all places are imbued with divinity: "If you interact with New York City as if there's an intelligence behind... then it will behave towards you the same way."
Keep reading Show less