"I might as well." or "why not?"

just thinkin out loud again

The name God was given to something we still don't understand.?.!.?  Most of my life I didn't consider or believe in any form of 'God' existing. My experiences lead me to do some more questioning.  At one point I asked myself, what is God?  I thought that God is the biggest thing there is.  Then I asked myself, what is the biggest thing there is?  I thought the answer was.. everything.  That was almost ten years ago.  I've thought about it every day since.  Sometimes a lot.  Sometimes, not much.  But, it's always there.


I'm thinking that all of us "people," here in the nature of things, still have some things to figure out about our existence.  Lets realize the complexity and be nice about it.  This is to everyone.  

(thinking out loud)....  We are in the now, experiencing a very specific moment in time from different perspectives.  This... one specific now-experience, together.  One out of everything or out of every possibility.  We share now.  Something like that..? 

How are we able to do something this real?  What would you do with forever? 

Every possibility can't just go away..?  It's eternal or more..?  It's huge.  God "the all knowing?"  I've thought that "every possibility" isn't the best way to describe the.... inescapable reality that always exist.  Sometimes I think it's the best description.  But, it just seems to complicate... or something... I don't know.  But, calling the answer "everything" seems to complicate the idea too.  So does calling it "the answer" and "it."  So does calling it "all" or "God."  It's every.. something? 

Every... how about 'Every?'  That's kind of a pretty name....

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