4 courses that will turn your podcast idea into solid gold

Anyone with a killer idea for a podcast can learn valuable tactics for turning that idea into a success with the training in the How to Start a Podcast Bundle.

Podcast hosts Alex Blumberg, Lewis Howes and John Lee Dumas.

  • This four-course podcasting bundle explores how to build a successful podcast brand.
  • Industry-recognized podcasting experts explain effective storytelling techniques.
  • The training digs into marketing techniques to make your podcast profitable.


There are currently more than 750,000 podcasts being produced around the globe. In the U.S. alone, more than 16 million people consider themselves avid podcast fans.

Anyone with a killer idea for a podcast can learn valuable tactics for turning that idea into a success with the training in the How to Start a Podcast Bundle.

A team of award-winning podcast veterans break down the steps for creating and producing a podcast that's appealing to both listeners and advertisers alike over four courses featuring 23 hours of content.

Podcasting 101 with John Lee Dumas has the host of EntrepreneurOnFire walk students through the technical, creative, and business elements behind running a successful podcast. The course covers everything from choosing the right equipment to audio editing to avenues for marketing your podcast.

The courses Power Your Podcast with Storytelling with Alex Blumberg and Essential Storytelling Techniques with the Producers from NPR's "Snap Judgment" explore the art of painting an audio picture, including constructing a compelling story arc, establishing strong characters and finding the higher themes that will resonate with an audience.

Finally, Start Your Profitable Podcast & Build A Brand With Lewis Howes digs into the monetization of podcasting as he explains the right marketing techniques to get your work noticed by advertisers.

Buy now: All four courses (a $266 value) are available now for only $19, a savings of over 90 percent.

Prices are subject to change.

How To Start A Podcast Bundle Feat. Award-Winning Podcast Producers - $19

Get the package for $19

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