Take your career to the next level by raising your EQ

Emotional intelligence is a skill sought by many employers. Here's how to raise yours.

  • Daniel Goleman's 1995 book Emotional Intelligence catapulted the term into widespread use in the business world.
  • One study found that EQ (emotional intelligence) is the top predictor of performance and accounts for 58% of success across all job types.
  • EQ has been found to increase annual pay by around $29,000 and be present in 90% of top performers.

Emotional intelligence helps us to recognize how our emotions affect our behavior and how to adjust our reactions in stressful work and life situations.

This matters more in the workplace than you may realize. One study found that EQ is the top predictor of performance and accounts for 58% of success across all job types. This skill has even been found to increase annual pay by around $29,000 and be present in 90% of top performers.

In other words, emotional intelligence is a skill sought by many employers. So, how do you build yours?

The Emotional Intelligence and Decision-Making Bundle is a great place to start. This 10-course bundle is on sale now for just $34.99.

The introductory course explains the fundamentals of EQ over 38 lessons. You'll gain insights into other people's emotions, learn how to improve relationships, and recognize how to better understand your own emotions and habitual behavioral patterns.

You'll also learn an essential career skill: conflict management. In this 68-lesson course, you'll be taught how to build rapport, listen, and understand empathy.

Emotions are the drivers behind anxiety and stress. In another knowledge-packed course, you'll be given all the tools to build your emotional resilience. Learning how to adapt to stressful situations is a skill everyone needs in all facets of life. And yes, of course EQ plays a big role in decision-making. One 53-lesson course asks you to investigate your rationality in decision-making, your objectiveness when working with others, and your problem-solving skills.

The Emotional Intelligence and Decision-Making Bundle is taught by Robin Hills, an emotional intelligence coach, trainer, and facilitator with over 35 years of business and commercial experience. He has taught over 57,000 students the art of EQ.

The Emotional Intelligence and Decision-Making Bundle is on sale now for just $34.99, a 96% discount from the original price.

Price subject to change.

The Emotional Intelligence & Decision-Making Bundle - $34.99

Raise Your EQ Today

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