Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

You're going to save a life today (and Seth Godin might pay you 10k to do it)

Acute Leukemia was the first issue we fought against at Involver. I'm telling that story today because a great person, Amit Gupta, was just diagnosed with this disease.


You can help save Amit's life. Here's how.  Go to the NYC Donor Drive on Oct. 14thorder a free test in the mail or donate money.

Update: Seth Godin has offered $10,000 to anyone who is a match and donates to Amit.

-- 

In 2007, a young man named Vinay Chakravarthy was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Vinay was an impressive guy at the start of his career, having just graduated medial school. He was in his late 20s. The only chance Vinay had was a bone marrow transplant.

Now, had Vinay been of European descent, he would have had a 1 in 200 chance of finding a bone marrow match, but the South Asian community is severely underrepresented in the Bone Marrow Registry. A South Asian's chances of finding a bone marrow match were only 1 in 20,000.

South Asians were 100x less likely to find a suitable bone marrow donor.

But, Vinay's community rallied around him. And then around a second young man, Sameer, in the same situation.Celebrities recorded video testimonials. Cross-country donor drives were setup by the community. Several people became volunteer coordinators, helping spread the word in various ways.

Around this same time I started working with Involver. This was a VERY different time in the company's history. The team was 5 people working out of a subleased office in Palo Alto. Mike hadn't even finished school yet and was working from UC Irvine in between classes.  But, it didn't take a big team to make a difference, just a well positioned one.

Involver (then called RapOuts) rallied around the mission as well, rapidly building a platform for social communities to help spread messages on social networks so that the Help Vinay campaign could use Facebook to spread the message. Ultimately we were successful in this aim.

The Help Vinay campaign was my first real introduction to the team that would ultimately create Involver and become my lifelong friends. Their passion to help empower the community fueled long hours and challenging goals. The idea was not only to help save Vinay and Sameer, but also to help save other South Asians who would face this scary situation in the future.

Help Vinay put a huge dent in the problem.

  • Over 300,000 people were introduced to the problem through videos and events
  • 24,611 new people got tested to see if they were a match
  • The Bone Marrow Registry's population of South Asians increased by 20%. 
  • Both Vinay and Sameer ultimately found matches that gave them a fighting chance.

    But the campaign didn't solve the underlying problem. The odds of finding a match in today's system is still low. The Registry needs more people, especially those of South Asian (and other minority) decent, to register.

    Recently another impressive person, Amit Gupta, was diagnosed with Acute Leukemia and is looking for a bone marrow match. Amit has positively influenced the lives of literally dozens of my friends - helping them each find their own paths to happiness. He's inspired hundreds through his work at Jelly, Photojojo, and his community projects. Amit is a precious part of the human race.

    I don't know if you've looked around lately, but we could use more people like Amit, not less. So let's fight for him. 

    So here are three ways you can help save Amit's life RIGHT NOW:

  • Signup to receive and complete a test via the mail
  • RSVP to attend the October 14th donor drive in NYC
  • Donate on Amit's Eventbrite Page
  • The test is simple (a cotton swab of the inside of your cheek). If you're a match for Amit (or anyone else), you can save their life with a simple and safe outpatient procedure to donate some marrow.

    AML has stolen too many lives. Stop it from taking another one.

    Malcolm Gladwell live! | Strangers, Storytelling, and Psychology

    Join the legend of non-fiction in conversation with best-selling author and poker pro Maria Konnikova.

    Big Think LIVE

    Add event to your calendar

    AppleGoogleOffice 365OutlookOutlook.comYahoo


    Keep reading Show less

    Map of the World's Countries Rearranged by Population

    China moves to Russia and India takes over Canada. The Swiss get Bangladesh, the Bangladeshi India. And the U.S.? It stays where it is. 

    Strange Maps

    What if the world were rearranged so that the inhabitants of the country with the largest population would move to the country with the largest area? And the second-largest population would migrate to the second-largest country, and so on?

    Keep reading Show less

    Hulu's original movie "Palm Springs" is the comedy we needed this summer

    Andy Samberg and Cristin Milioti get stuck in an infinite wedding time loop.

    Gear
    • Two wedding guests discover they're trapped in an infinite time loop, waking up in Palm Springs over and over and over.
    • As the reality of their situation sets in, Nyles and Sarah decide to enjoy the repetitive awakenings.
    • The film is perfectly timed for a world sheltering at home during a pandemic.
    Keep reading Show less

    Scientists solve the origin of Stonehenge’s sarsen stones

    Most of Stonehenge's megaliths, called sarens, came from West Woods, Wiltshire.

    Culture & Religion
  • Researchers have known Stonehenge's smaller bluestones came from Preseli Hills, Wales, but the source of its sarsens has remained a mystery.
  • Using chemical analysis, scientists found at matching source at West Woods, approximately 25 kilometer north of the World Heritage Site.
  • But mysteries remain, such as why that site was chosen.
  • Keep reading Show less
    Culture & Religion

    Why are there so many humans?

    Having lots of kids is great for the success of the species. But there's a hitch.

    Scroll down to load more…
    Quantcast