The Art of the Five-Minute Favor

You should be willing to do something that will take 5 minutes or less for anybody. This simple notion is not only important for the purpose of being altruistic. It turns out that givers get good karma. 

The Art of the Five-Minute Favor

You should be willing to do something that will take 5 minutes or less for anybody. This simple notion is not only important for the purpose of being altruistic. It turns out that givers get good karma. 


One of the masters of the five-minute favor is Adam Rifkin, who was listed by Fortune as the best networker, with more connections on LinkedIn to the most powerful people in the world than anyone else. It turns out that this is due to the fact that Rifkin is a giver, "a sun with many different solar systems," writes Adam Grant in his new book Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success

Watch the Grant explain the art of the five-minute favor here:

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

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