We Must Equip Our Youth to Thrive in a Changing World

Words of wisdom from FDR: "We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future."

Today's words of wisdom come from former American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945), whom we assume you've probably heard of.


The quote below, derived from a 1940 address to the University of Pennsylvania, signals that our dream of creating a perfect future for our children isn't entirely realizable. With that understood, it's entirely possible — heck, it's imperative — to equip our children with the knowledge, skills, and support necessary to make their world a better place. This is a very "fishers of men" kind of quote perfectly suited for the trials and opportunities of the modern world.

How many kids today are taught to code before high school? How many high school graduates enter the real world with little to no knowledge about personal finance? Are our children prepared with the necessary resilience skills to exist and compete on a global stage?

We can't always make the world the way we want, but we can prepare our youth for what it will be.

"We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future."

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