Nikola Tesla Describes the Thrill of Invention

"I do not think there is any thrill that can go through the human heart like that felt by the inventor as he sees some creation of the brain unfolding to success. ... Such emotions make a man forget food, sleep, friends, love, everything."

Nikola Tesla Describes the Thrill of Invention

Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was a pioneer scientist during the turn of the 20th century best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system. Tesla was a physicist, mechanical & electric engineer, inventor and futurist, as well as the possessor of a near-eidetic memory. He spoke eight languages and held 300 patents by the end of his life. His legacy has experienced a major resurgence in recent years — the name Tesla, as you might have heard, is way in vogue right now — as many of his predictions have inspired the search for wireless, unlimited supplies of power.


Tesla was as known for his tenacity and passion for science as he was for his expertise. Here's a quotation that embodies that:

"I do not think there is any thrill that can go through the human heart like that felt by the inventor as he sees some creation of the brain unfolding to success. ... Such emotions make a man forget food, sleep, friends, love, everything."

The world is full of Tesla fans and devotees, although the most notable is almost certainly Elon Musk. Check out the video below featuring the Tesla CEO:

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Sponsored by Singleton
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