Jonas Salk on Humanity's Greatest Responsibility

"Our greatest responsibility is to be good ancestors."

Jonas Salk on Humanity's Greatest Responsibility

Jonas Salk (1914-1995) was the American medical researcher who developed the first polio vaccine in the mid-1950s. Exceptional in his degree of altruism, Salk famously told journalist Edward Murrow that he sought no patent for the vaccine, equating the thought to patenting the sun. While polio was a devastating, worldwide affliction in the early 1950s, today there are only three countries in which the disease is endemic.


"Our greatest responsibility is to be good ancestors."

-Jonas Salk, as quoted in Learning from the Future : Competitive Foresight Scenarios (1998) by Liam Fahey and Robert M. Randall, p. 332. (h/t Wikiquote)

Imagines: Public Domain

A Cave in France Changes What We Thought We Knew About Neanderthals

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Image source: yannvdb/Wikimedia Commons
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In a French cave deep underground, scientists have discovered what appear to be 176,000-year-old man-made structures. That's 150,000 years earlier than any that have been discovered anywhere before. And they could only have been built by Neanderthals, people who were never before considered capable of such a thing.

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Credit: NIKOLAY OSMACHKO from Pexels
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Surprising Science

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