General Patton or Shakespeare's Henry V: Who Said It Better?

Two of the most famously rousing speeches in history, though one is from a dramatic work, address many of the same topics: bravery, fear, camaraderie, and death.

Two of the most famously rousing speeches in history address many of the same topics: bravery, fear, camaraderie, and death.


General George S. Patton delivered his speech to the American Army on several occasions as it prepared for the D-Day invasion of Normandy during World War II.

Patton's aggressive approach to war ultimately cost him his career, though not before winning him many supporters — and battles.

At the battle of Agincourt in 1415, England's King Henry V was vastly outnumbered by French fighters, yet the English army carried the day.

Shakespeare dramatizes the unlikely victory by writing Henry a speech that inspires in his men a miraculous fighting spirit.

GENERAL GEORGE S. PATTON AND SHAKESPEARE'S HENRY V ON DYING:

ON CAMARADERIE:

ON BRAVERY:

ON TEAMWORK:

ON FEAR:

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