New AQAP Statement

Well it has been a busy few days for Yemen and while we have been following the developments, I have refrained from blogging in order to spend time with the family. But as the new week starts, I thought it would be helpful to get back in the swing of things.

Before I get into the details of the Christmas Eve raid and all of the confused reporting about who was there and who was targeted. I thought it would be helpful to discuss a bit the most recent AQAP statement, which was put out yesterday. The statement was, in my view, fairly generic and didn't give much details about the December 17 raids and besides the rather pro forma calls for resistance it didn't say anything that I haven't heard before.

There is, however, a new AQAP statement that is being teased on the jihadi forums and which should be released soon. Stat tuned to Waq al-waq for more.

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