You Are What You Eat - and Drink

H. Robert Silverstein: The human salivary glands contain an enzyme called p-t-y-l . . .  p-t-y-a-l-i-n – ptyalin.  That is an enzyme that is for the digestion of carbohydrate.  Carbohydrate is not protein.  We don’t have fangs.  We have four of 32 poorly developed canine teeth for tearing meat.  And I can keep going on for the list of things of why the human body is designed to be mostly vegetarian. Vegan is 100 percent.  If you do the math on four out of 32, that’s 87.5 percent.  So instead of 100 percent, being vegan is 100 percent.  So I think our diet is supposed to be organic, unprocessed, whole foods at the 87.5 percent level with the other 12.5 percent being meat or . . .  And that should be free-range meat, pasture fed meat, or wild fish, or cage free eggs as examples of the type of animal protein that we can have.  So that translates, if you do the math, to a palm sized serving of animal protein two to three times a week.  Actually it’s 2.5 times a week.  So we could have a palm sized . . . your palm for you, my palm for me, Wilt Chamberlin’s palm for him, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar palm for him.  We can have palm sized servings two to three times a week, and we will then be fitting with our natural biologic design.  And once again that’s what real preventive medicine is.  It is being in tune with what is our natural biologic design.  And our biologic design calls for us to be lean, trim, low percent body fat, active, positive, non-smoking; highly organic, unprocessed, whole foods diet and so on.  So you . . .  I think that we are designed to be mostly vegetarian.  And do it or don’t do it by invitation.  This is not a command.  This is what your biology is.  Fish are supposed to breathe water.  Birds are supposed to fly.  I don’t advise the human race to go to a cliff and jump off because they want to be like a bird.  Or stay under water for two hours because they want to be like a fish, unless obviously they bring their above water air with them.  And so what I’m saying to you is that there is a natural human design, and I’ve already given that several times – breathe right, drink right, eat right, exercise right, think right, and then diseases don’t happen.

Silverstein describes the benefits of a healthy diet and discredits stories about red wine and possible health benefits.

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