Why are you running?

Question: Why are you running?

Dennis Kucinich: Well, you know, I was asked those questions throughout my career. In 40 years, I’ve . . . I think I’ve had about 33 elections counting primaries and generals; won 25 or 26 of them. So I, you know . . . I know how to win and I’m prepared to be president. Now look, I know I’m an underdog. But recent polls show me just a few points out of third place in New Hampshire. The Democracy for America poll of Internet activists of a week or so ago, I came out first in the largest poll in the country of Internet activists. So look I know I’m a long shot. But you know what? So are most American people. It’s a long shot for people that they’re gonna have their retirement security; a long shot that they’ll have a good paying job; a long shot that they’ll have healthcare and won’t go broke paying the doctor bills; a long shot their kids will go to college. I mean American people understand long shots. Imagine a long shot who becomes your president and relates to you. I mean that’s why these polls can change, and I just have to move up little, by little, by little.

Recorded on: 10/19/07

Dennis Kucinich says he is an underdog running to win.

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(Public Domain/CNP/Getty Images)
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