Where is technology headed?

Question: Where is technology headed?

Peter Rojas: But I think we’re really seeing the beginning of . . . I mean I’ve been watching the Mobile Space and the Smart Phone Space for a long time . . . you know five or six years. And I mean even before that with Red Herring. But it’s really starting to, like, heat up. The Smartphone space is actually getting interesting now. And I think we’re reaching the point where, you know, it’s moving beyond sort of business users with their Blackberries and things like that to the general public. And just like . . . I think we’re gonna see . . . we’re seeing sort of a similar reflection point when the Web went from most consumers were on a dialup Web to a broadband Web. We’re kind of seeing the same thing happening with the mobile Web where most . . . Like we’re starting to see more and more consumers go from a kind of a dumb flip phone, you know, with the basically like slow mobile broadband connection . . . mobile connection . . . mobile data connection to a . . . to like kind of smart, rich experience handsets that have like a broadband connection. And the iPhone is sort of the one everyone talks about. But we’ve been seeing . . . Like the iPhone is really just sort of like the . . . maybe just a well-known iteration of what is just a trend that is . . . has really gone on for maybe about the past three of four years. I think we’re gonna start seeing a lot more richness to the experience. And I think that we’re gonna start to see, you know, people that are, you know, integrating these devices into their lives more and more and more, and taking it and being able to do more with them. And I think the biggest issue is gonna be how open of a platform are these mobile devices gonna be?

 

 

Moving the Blackberry beyond businessmen.

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