What is your counsel?

Jean-Francois Rischard: I think in terms of what we need for this planet to have a future and solve these big issues before it’s too late, we need two things. We need this new methodology of some kind that I mentioned earlier, and brining up a new methodology of global problem solving. Whether it’s the global issues network idea that I mentioned or some other idea, that is for the heads of state to deliver or the Prime Minister of this world to deliver on. And individuals in that area can be active as voters, as lobbyists, as civil society and help push towards that direction. But the main way in which individuals can help is with regard to the second thing we need to have a future on this planet; and that has to do not with methodological changes, but with mindset changes. The type of individual we need from here on is an individual who feels that he or she is first a global citizen; second only a national citizen, and third only a local citizen. Right now we have it the other way around, and the other way around is deadly for this planet. And so we should all try to – through education systems, through our children, through the next generation – to push for that sort of mindset. Because without that sort of mindset – that global citizenship mindset – even the new methodology like the one I described would not be enough. You need the combination of the two. Recorded on: 7/2/07

Develop a global-citizenship mindset, Rischard says.

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