What is the measure of a good life?

Question: What is the measure of a good life?

D. Quinn Mills: Two important things. Number one, that you do your best to help people who need help, who were in need, the disadvantaged etcetera that is crucial and secondly, that you try to keep yourself unsullied from the world, that you try to live a moral life and if you do those two things that seems to me to constitute what...by the way that is the message of James who is the brother of Jesus in his letter which he survived into the New Testament and it is probably the earliest document we have from the Christian era.

Recorded on: 9/27/07

We need to help those who need help.

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