Ted Kennedy on Spirituality and Modernity

Ted Kennedy: I’ve always believed that we are created in the images of God, and that the Bible teaches us in Matthew about feeding the hungry and giving to those that are thirsty, and clothing the naked, and welcoming the stranger and visiting the imprisoned. And what Dr. [Martin Luther] King said about walking humbly, loving mercy, and doing justice.

I think these words can be simple words, but they can also be guiding words. And they’ve been guiding for me in the United States Senate, where I’ve tried to enhance opportunities for individuals in the areas of education and healthcare; and also knocking down walls of discrimination that have been a part of our country and our society, written into the Constitution, and the founding fathers.

And we fought the Civil War, and we had Dr. King, and we had the early 1960s where we began to knock down walls of discrimination on the basis of race, and gender, and ethnicity; and in more recent times on the issues of disability. And some progress made in knocking down walls of discrimination based upon people’s – whether they were gay or lesbians as well. We want to try and free ourselves from the forms of discrimination and bigotry which exist in our nation. Though people are on the receiving end of that, but it is also those that are on the giving end, should free themselves from that kind of bigotry.

And it can’t be done just legislatively. It has to be done with the work of communities and with the works of churches. And that’s a continuing challenge.

 

Recorded on: September 14, 2007

Ted Kennedy on Spirituality and Modernity

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