Soon You May Want to Hang Out at Work with Your Friends

The future of the workforce is about building stronger communities, not talent hunting for the most aggressively competitive employees. Millennials are leading the way in making this change.

Tamar Elkeles:  I think the workforce of the future there's a couple of really key points. I think one is we need to figure out ways to utilize women in more leadership roles across organizations and I think we are at an inflection point around that. I'm thrilled to see that in 2016 there are things like in the Watermark Silicon Valley Conference for Women, that there are more women's leadership programs out there. And I do think that diversity and inclusion are a big part of the workforce of the future. In 1995 I did my doctoral dissertation on stereotyping of women in engineering. And I look at that and I say that was 20 years ago. I think today we have huge opportunities, as well as a huge platform for us to be able to change the workforce, to be able to embrace women in more leadership roles. Diversity inclusion is really about perspectives. It's really about having diversity of perspective and diversity of thought. And that is independent of gender, that is independent of race, that is independent of ethnicity. That is really all about making sure that we have diversity of people in the room that have different experiences that come from different places. So, people that have an experience working in an established operation versus people from a startup, people who just graduated from college versus people with 25 years of experience, people from different industries, people from different locations in the world. And I think that's really what makes a great company.

In addition to that I really think that the millennial workforce or the next-generation workforce is really thinking about work differently. It's a give and take. It's an opportunity for an organization to give, and here in Silicon Valley there's a lot of entitlements around these cultures and around these employee bases. There is food everywhere. There is free services everywhere. There is lots of perks and lots of opportunities that other big companies can't offer to their employees. And I think that is changing the game. What we're saying is the workplace is an environment that you want to create. It is not just a place that you come to do your job, it is a place where you come to be social, it's a place when you come with your friends, it's a place where you can come and not only be yourself and do your work but also share with others and be part of a bigger community. And if we look at what happened with social media and with the networking, there's a lot of opportunities today to build communities. And that's what we're going to be doing of the workforce of the future is building communities where people want to work, they want to play and they want to be around those people on a day-to-day basis.

 

The workplace is more than a place to work; it's a social environment, says human resources executive Tamar Elkeles. Companies built by millennials are changing the face of corporate life, taking it away from a competitive, dog-eat-dog atmosphere to one of "diversity inclusion." This means brining people together from all different backgrounds to contribute their unique points of view to find innovative solutions to common problems.

Harness the Power of Calm

Tap into the "Rest and Digest" System to Achieve Your Goals

Big Think Edge
  • In the fast-paced workplaces and productivity-focused societies many of us inhabit today, it is easy to burnout.
  • Emma Seppälä, a Stanford researcher on human happiness, recommends tapping into the parasympathetic nervous system instead—"rest and digest"rather than "fight or flight."
  • Aiming for energy management rather than time management will give you the resilience you need to excel at the things that really matter in your life and career, rather than living "mostly off" by attempting to seem "always on."

Apple co-founder says we should all ditch Facebook — permanently

Steve Wozniak doesn't know if his phone is listening, but he's minimizing risks.

Photo by Bryan Steffy/Getty Images
Technology & Innovation
  • Steve Wozniak didn't hold back his feelings about the social media giant when stopped at an airport.
  • The Apple co-founder admitted that devices spying on his conversations is worrisome.
  • Wozniak deleted his Facebook account last year, recommending that "most people" should do the same.
Keep reading Show less

Where the evidence of fake news is really hiding

When it comes to sniffing out whether a source is credible or not, even journalists can sometimes take the wrong approach.

Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • We all think that we're competent consumers of news media, but the research shows that even journalists struggle with identifying fact from fiction.
  • When judging whether a piece of media is true or not, most of us focus too much on the source itself. Knowledge has a context, and it's important to look at that context when trying to validate a source.
  • The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect.
Keep reading Show less