"Shalom in The Home"

Question: What is “Shalom in the Home”?

Shmuley Boateach: Well aside from being a television show, which everyone should watch . . . turn me off right now and watch “Shalom in the Home”. No, since you’re watching me, it’s okay. Turn someone else off and watch “Shalom in the Home”. Aside from it being a TV show, “Shalom in the Home” is a belief that our homes can be peaceful. It’s a belief that homes don’t have to be warzones. It’s a belief that there need not be a generation gap, a gender gap; that husbands and wives can really have deep intimacy, and they can be forged together as bone of one bone and flesh of one flesh; that you don’t have to be lonely, even when you’re married. “Shalom in the Home” is a belief that just because kids are younger than us and they go through their stages, it doesn’t mean their parents can’t connect with them; that parents can’t empathize with them; that parents can’t step out of the limitations of their own experience and enter their children’s shoes to really see it from their perspective, to really listen to their kids. “Shalom in the Home” means that while the rest of the world might be a place of conflict, your home can be a bastion of tranquility.

Recorded on: 09/05/2007

Your home can be a bastion of tranquility, Boteach says.

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