Retiring from Professional Sports

Jimmy Conrad: Yeah I guess it depends on the sport, my position fortunately allows me to play a little bit longer most guys that I have watched in this league are, I have seen retire of late in there mid 30s. I don’t know how much longer I want to play, I want to make sure I play to a point where I thought I can still contribute and that can help the team and in my position I can just yell the younger guys to do my job for me and I kind of sweep behind them.

It just kind of depends on the formation, how I am feeling physically and mentally as well, I think that is you still wanted to be excited about what you are doing. But I am very passionate about the next phase of things.

There is a part of me that is very excited that my kids will never know I played and they are just going to know me as whatever I do next. That excites me and fascinates me on some level that they will never see me like in then paper or on TV or doing any kind of stuff in regards to playing. It will always it will be something different and so I find that quite humorous actually, that they will ever know that dad in that fashion.

 

Jimmy Conrad: It used to take me like a day to recover from a game and it takes me like three and so and just in different ways, nagging injuries that used to last a couple of days now last two weeks stuff like that but I have done a lot of like my time kind of stuff whether it be Yoga or polites and really tried to be open minded about that stuff to help me on the field and when I think it is helped me out.

Quite a bit guys use to make fun of me when I use to the yoga and polites and now they are like, well can I sign up for a class because they see that I am healthy, I don’t get strains very often, I don’t cramp up, I am running faster and harder than they are in consistent basis, I always have more energy and so I think that I have kind of keyed in to something and I think the league in general and players in general, it is going to be a little more open minded and evolving to where they need to be.

 

Jimmy Conrad: I don’t know, that’s I don’t really know when that’s going to be, I don’t know that exact moment, I think it’s just going to; I really from what I have gathered when I talk to other players that have retired it’s kind of like just I don’t want to do this anymore, I can just kind of had it with the process and from their perspective the league was still trying to figure it out and there is a lot of behind the scenes, a turmoil that I could see why they would just kind of grade on their nerves and just be like you have not had it.

But I feel like our league is growing up so much especially in the last couple of years. We are starting to become more and more professional as a league, players are treated with more professionalism that it makes me excited to go to work everyday.

I don’t know when that’s going to be, I don’t know when that switch is going to be but we can come back here and talk about it when I figure that out.

 

Conrad's position in soccer allows him a longer than normal professional career.

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