Re: Who are you?

David Kennedy: My name’s David Kennedy. And I’m the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History at Stanford University. I grew up in Seattle, Washington. I don’t think of it so much as where I came from exactly as when I came from. I was born in 1941. My childhood was deeply shaped by World War II as a kind of ambient thing. Seattle was a big ship and port for the Pacific War, so war stuff was all around when I was a kid. And Seattle became a boom town. Growing up in a very active but still quite provincial city out on the far western shores of the United States was a very peculiar experience. I see that now looking back from later in life. Of course I took it for granted at the time. But I think it made me, among other things, acutely aware of, or curious about what was this larger society of which poor, remote Seattle was not a part?

Recorded on: 7/4/07

 

 

The ambient noise of World War II.

The 4 types of thinking talents: Analytic, procedural, relational and innovative

Understanding thinking talents in yourself and others can build strong teams and help avoid burnout.

Big Think Edge
  • Learn to collaborate within a team and identify "thinking talent" surpluses – and shortages.
  • Angie McArthur teaches intelligent collaboration for Big Think Edge.
  • Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships.
Keep reading Show less

Brazilian scientists produce mini-brains with eyes

Using a new process, a mini-brain develops retinal cells.

Surprising Science
  • Mini-brains, or "neural organoids," are at the cutting edge of medical research.
  • This is the first one that's started developing eyes.
  • Stem cells are key to the growing of organoids of various body parts.
Keep reading Show less

Do you have a self-actualized personality? Maslow revisited

Rediscovering the principles of self-actualisation might be just the tonic that the modern world is crying out for.

Personal Growth

Abraham Maslow was the 20th-century American psychologist best-known for explaining motivation through his hierarchy of needs, which he represented in a pyramid. At the base, our physiological needs include food, water, warmth and rest.

Keep reading Show less