Re: What is your question?

Well the person that I’ve covered who I probably admire the most was Mike Mansfield, the former democratic leader of the Senate and our long time ambassador to Japan. He was a remarkable individual who, well into his 90s, was current on public affairs and invariably wise in his comments. I’d love to know what Mike Mansfield thinks we ought to do about Iraq and other issues today.

Well thinking about this presidential election coming up, I think the issue that will be on my mind is which, if any, of these people are prepared to tell the American people the hard choices that we really face as a country; and build the degree of confidence that would enable people to make that choice. It’s going to be a very tough presidency, and it’s gonna take a remarkable person to prevail in it. And I hope we find that kind of leadership. Recorded on: 9/12/07

Broder would like to have a chat with Mike Mansfield.

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