Re: What is George W. Bush's legacy?

I’m not sure the legacy of George W. Bush will be the legacy that he thought it would be when he took office. No doubt the legacy will be how Iraq turns out. No matter what George W. Bush thinks, in my view, about what his legacy will be, it will be inextricably linked to the war. If the war is ultimately seen as a successful effort against terrorism and a successful military venture by the United States, then his legacy will be good. If it’s seen ultimately as a disastrous effort to stop Saddam Hussein from utilizing weapons of mass destruction, and an effort to keep Al Qaeda from coming to the United States, it may be viewed differently. If a terrorism attack occurs in the United States, it may be viewed one way. If no terrorism attack occurs here for five years, 10 years into the future, his effort may be looked at differently. I think the president is very much inspired by Harry Truman’s situation. Harry Truman left Washington in 1953 when Dwight Eisenhower became president a very unpopular person. His popularity ratings were probably 15 to 19 percent, and nobody had a big sendoff for him. He walked to the train station essentially and went back to Missouri. In hindsight, people think that Harry Truman was a great president. In hindsight they think he did some very courageous things. I think George Bush is propelled to think that the same thing might happen to him; that five years, 10 years, 15 years down the road people will say, “Well it’s a good thing that he fought the war in Iraq because of the things that developed subsequently.” I don’t think we have that perspective today. I think today the war is not that popular for sure, and George Bush isn’t viewed today as Harry Truman is viewed today. But I think he views it possible . . . possibly the case that he will be viewed that way. Recorded on: 9/13/07

Bush's legacy will be intimately tied to the war in Iraq.

​There are two kinds of failure – but only one is honorable

Malcolm Gladwell teaches "Get over yourself and get to work" for Big Think Edge.

Big Think Edge
  • Learn to recognize failure and know the big difference between panicking and choking.
  • At Big Think Edge, Malcolm Gladwell teaches how to check your inner critic and get clear on what failure is.
  • Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships.
Keep reading Show less

Scientists reactivate cells from 28,000-year-old woolly mammoth

"I was so moved when I saw the cells stir," said 90-year-old study co-author Akira Iritani. "I'd been hoping for this for 20 years."

Yamagata et al.
Surprising Science
  • The team managed to stimulate nucleus-like structures to perform some biological processes, but not cell division.
  • Unless better technology and DNA samples emerge in the future, it's unlikely that scientists will be able to clone a woolly mammoth.
  • Still, studying the DNA of woolly mammoths provides valuable insights into the genetic adaptations that allowed them to survive in unique environments.
Keep reading Show less

Saying no is hard. These communication tips make it easy.

You can say 'no' to things, and you should. Do it like this.

Videos
  • Give yourself permission to say "no" to things. Saying yes to everything is a fast way to burn out.
  • Learn to say no in a way that keeps the door of opportunity open: No should never be a one-word answer. Say "No, but I could do this instead," or, "No, but let me connect you to someone who can help."
  • If you really want to say yes but can't manage another commitment, try qualifiers like "yes, if," or "yes, after."
Keep reading Show less