Re: What do you believe?

I think my major philosophy is rooted in two aspects. The first aspect is that we should believe in institution building and not personalities. Institutions should be _______ our activities. All our activities must be based on institutions and not personalities. So in Africa our challenge is how do we build good institutions? How do you build a value system? And we should always depend on institutions and value systems; but it takes time to develop value systems. It takes time to build institutions; but there is no alternative to institution building and the development of a value system. The second piece of my philosophy is around science and technology – that we need to make sure we use science and technology as key drivers to bring about economic transformation, which then empowers our people economically so that their ________ conditions are improved in terms of access to health, access to education, access to jobs. The right to a job should be understood as a human right. And that there has to be some degree of equitable distribution of wealth so that the gap between the “haves” and the “have nots” is not draconian; but at the same time respecting the role of the market, competition, creativity, innovation. But there has to be an element of social justice that says inclusiveness – participatory democratic existence that says the people must participate in the economy. These are the ideas that drive my philosophy on the economy and around economics. It has to be a collective definition of a good life. The definition of a good life to me is a society, a world where the majority of the people have the fundamental, basic rights – freedom of association, freedom of assembly, freedom from poverty. A world where the right to a job is an economic right. A world where the lives of all human beings is meaningful. It doesn’t have to be a luxury. It’s meaningful. People are content. People have the basic needs. And we can’t . . . We’re not talking here about equal outcomes. We’re talking about equal opportunities. If we can guarantee equal opportunities to citizens of the globe, that will be a measure of success. Recorded On: 7/ 5/07

Africans should believe in institution building, not personalities.

Afghanistan is the most depressed country on earth

No, depression is not just a type of 'affluenza' – poor people in conflict zones are more likely candidates

Image: Our World in Data / CC BY
Strange Maps
  • Often seen as typical of rich societies, depression is actually more prevalent in poor, conflict-ridden countries
  • More than one in five Afghans is clinically depressed – a sad world record
  • But are North Koreans really the world's 'fourth least depressed' people?
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Banned books: 10 of the most-challenged books in America

America isn't immune to attempts to remove books from libraries and schools, here are ten frequent targets and why you ought to go check them out.

Nazis burn books on a huge bonfire of 'anti-German' literature in the Opernplatz, Berlin. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Culture & Religion
  • Even in America, books are frequently challenged and removed from schools and public libraries.
  • Every year, the American Library Association puts on Banned Books Week to draw attention to this fact.
  • Some of the books they include on their list of most frequently challenged are some of the greatest, most beloved, and entertaining books there are.
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Videos
  • Oumuamua, a quarter-mile long asteroid tumbling through space, is Hawaiian for "scout", or "the first of many".
  • It was given this name because it came from another solar system.
  • Some claimed 'Oumuamua was an alien technology, but there's no actual evidence for that.