Re: What do you believe?

My personal philosophy . . . I don’t have a motto, but I always . . . I always . . . I always dream. I always take risks. I try to keep my eyes open. They can be very subtle. It can be in how we construct something or, you know, in business deals that we . . . that we’ve made or, you know, just moving in with my boyfriend. You know, it’s . . . they all affect each other. Not really any particular _____. I decided to move to London when I was 17 and just go to school there instead of sort of furthering an academic education. It’s keeping . . . That keeping your eyes opening and listening to others, and having a dialogue with others. And then that’s . . . That’s my motto. And the risk I take is . . . It can expose you to a lot that can distract or affect you. I’m a very open, sensitive person. But also you have to have that conversation and then go into isolation, take that and filter it, and then go back to being a sponge. No. I don’t dismiss religion or faith, you know. I’m still alive on this planet, and I think that in its truest forms, you know, in some way or other I’ve lived by a sort of mix of many religions. You know I always believe in bettering who I can be and striving to a higher place from there on my time on the planet. So in some ways, I don’t know if that will affect any possibility of an afterlife in any way; but I think that’s pretty similar to foundations of Christianity, and Judaism, and you know, and Buddhism. I don’t have one God that I . . . that I look up to. Recorded on: 7/31/07

Posen doesn't have one god he looks up to.

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

Reigning in brutality - how one man's outrage led to the Red Cross and the Geneva Conventions

The history of the Geneva Conventions tells us how the international community draws the line on brutality.

Napoleon III at the Battle of Solferino. Painting by Adolphe Yvon. 1861.
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Henry Dunant's work led to the Red Cross and conventions on treating prisoners humanely.
  • Four Geneva Conventions defined the rules for prisoners of war, torture, naval and medical personnel and more.
  • Amendments to the agreements reflect the modern world but have not been ratified by all countries.
Keep reading Show less

The most culturally chauvinist people in Europe? Greeks, new research suggests

Meanwhile, Spaniards are the least likely to say their culture is superior to others.

Image: Pew Research Center
Strange Maps
  • Survey by Pew Research Center shows great variation in chauvinism across Europe.
  • Eight most chauvinist countries are in the east, and include Russia.
  • British much more likely than French (and slightly more likely than Germans) to say their culture is "superior" to others.
Keep reading Show less

A map of London's most toxic breathing spots

Air pollution is up to five times over the EU limit in these Central London hotspots.

Strange Maps
  • Dirty air is an invisible killer, but an effective one.
  • More than 9,000 people die prematurely in London each year due to air pollution, a recent study estimates.
  • This map visualizes the worst places to breathe in Central London.
Keep reading Show less