Re: If you had $100 billion to give away, how would you spend it?

I don’t have any magic answers, you know. I’d like to balance between helping individual people, you know, in their lives and engaging in systemic change. And I think that’s always . . . that’s always the balance. Do I give to the beggar on the street? Do I give to the individual person who is homeless? Do I, you know, build that one-house makeover house? Or do I figure out how to stimulate systemic change so that the problems actually get addressed? And I’d like to think that I balance between those two things. And then all the balances – the balances between my own neighborhood, my own city in New York City and the world. So local, and national, and international. The most personal, case-driven, non-systemic individual person with pain to the largest systemic. I’d like to hope that I build leverages and partnerships; that I’d like to be able to give it away without worrying whether my name is associated with it or not. If my name associated with it actually generates greater partnerships and leverages, yes use my name. If my name keeps people from actually joining, then don’t ever use my name. It could be anonymous. I’d like to feel that those kind of tensions, I’d be able to negotiate and navigate so that at the end, that important energy – because money is one of the most important currencies and one of the most important energy forms we have; that that money will, you know, do a lot of good. Recorded on: 8/15/07

Kula seeks to provide aid on three levels: local, and national, and international, from the most personal, case-driven, non-systemic individual person with pain to the largest systemic institution.

Meet the Bajau sea nomads — they can reportedly hold their breath for 13 minutes

The Bajau people's nomadic lifestyle has given them remarkable adaptions, enabling them to stay underwater for unbelievable periods of time. Their lifestyle, however, is quickly disappearing.

Wikimedia Commons
Culture & Religion
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Some evidence attributes a certain neurological phenomenon to a near death experience.

Credit: Petr Kratochvil. PublicDomainPictures.net.
Surprising Science

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Shogo Hamada/Cornell University
Surprising Science
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