Re: How do you contribute?

So far we have managed to raise the profile of issues in the country and internationally. Secondly, we have managed to campaign on the grounds through defiance campaigns, through demonstrations, strikes and rallies so that we can put pressure on the regime of Robert Mugabe in our country so that we can demand conditions for free and fair. So we have achieved the propaganda wall around creation of conditions for free and fair. Secondly, we have also achieved – or we’re still working on – building a united front inspired by a single _______ principle so that in any election in our country, we can present a viable and electable opposition that can win power against the dictatorship of Robert Mugabe. So creating conditions for free and fair elections – we are working on that. We’re raising the proffer of that issue. Creating a united front to win elections – we’re working on that. And we’re raising the proffer on that matter. And also number three, we have been crafting the economic blueprints – the economic solutions – that will allow our country to move from poverty to the Promised Land. So this . . . this is what defines our achievements; but there are achievements that are part of work in progress. They are not complete, but they’re the achievements that define our efforts to bring about resolutions in our country. The legacy of my part – the legacy of my colleagues and myself . . . I don’t believe in individual legacy. I believe in collective legacy. I believe in generational legacy. The legacy of my generation and my country is that of transforming Zimbabwe from poverty, from crisis, to make Zimbabwe a globally competitive economy – making Zimbabwe the Singapore of Africa. Making Zimbabwe the Switzerland of Africa. If as a generation we’re able to make Zimbabwe the Malaysia, the Singapore of Africa in terms of GDP, per capita income, business growth, economic empowerment of all my people, that will be our legacy – an economic legacy and an economic mandate. And at a broader level, we’re seeking a legacy for Africans. If as Africans . . . If as a generation of Africans we’re able to make African countries globally competitive economy and also build regional integration ________, A.U., the United States of Africa . . . if we can make Africa as a continent economically successful, then that’s the legacy we seek as a generation. Our legacy is around the economy. Our mandate is an economic mandate. That’s the legacy that we seek. We are sick and tired as Africans of being beggars. We’re sick and tired of these cycles of poverty and conflict. We want Africa to be a successful continent. We don’t seek charity. We don’t seek aid from anyone. We want economic development, we want investment so that Africans can be successful through economic development, through investment. We’re saying as Africans we want to be in charge of our natural resources. We want to make sure that we are producing refined products so that we’re selling cars. We’re selling computers to Europe, to America. We want to sell cars to Detroit and not _______ from Africa. So our legacy should be a legacy that makes Africa economically successful through value added manufacturing, through beneficiation, through the use of new technologies – wireless power, wireless telecoms, WIFI, WIMAX – through biotechnology, through clean energy. We have a unique opportunity actually to use _______ and cleaner technologies than the rest . . . than advanced countries. We have a unique opportunity to run where others walked. So that’s the legacy we seek – a revolution in economy; a revolution driven by science and technology in Africa so that Africans can become global players that are respected because of connectivity; that are respected because of output. We seek to become competitors to America, competitors to Japan, and competitors to Europe, and not second class citizens _______ globalization. That’s our legacy. Recorded On: 7/5/07

If we can make Africa as a continent economically successful, then that’s the legacy we seek as a generation, Mutambara says.

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