Re: Can newspapers survive the digital revolution?

I think that’s an open question. Our audience is clearly migrating – and pretty rapidly – from the print version to the Internet version. I’m inclined to think that this is a transition period and not just a steadily accelerating decline. Washington Post has had a smart strategy of building its web site and building revenue on the web site, so I think that we’re gonna be able to survive. Well I think the biggest problem is our economic question mark. Are people going to be willing to finance the kind of costly investment that it takes to produce quality journalism? That labor-intensive work. The two women who __________ the Washington Post who broke the story about the abuse of prisoners . . . of veterans at Walter Reed Hospital spent four months on that story. That’s very expensive to have two highly trained, professional reporters working for four months on one story. But that story produced an enormous change of policy. And the question mark is whether people are willing to support that kind of investment in quality journalism. Recorded on: 9/13/07

Broder believes that we're seeing a transition, rather than a steady decline.

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