Pogue on the Future of Televisions

David Pogue: There’s one called Sony. I follow them all, you know?

My mission in the [New York Times] column is to present what’s new and to put it in context; so the first, the best, the cheapest, a new approach of doing something. These are always things that get my attention and my editor’s attention.

And then why it’s significant, if it’s significant. That’s the other part that every column is supposed to answer. So how is it different from what came before, what new trend?

I recently reviewed the world’s first OLED television. It comes from Sony. It’s an 11-inch screen, the towering power of a shoebox lid, but it’s the most beautiful picture you’ve ever seen.

It’s not like looking out a window; it’s like looking out a window with the glass removed. You feel like you can touch what’s on the screen and it costs 25 hundred dollars. And everyone’s like, “Why would you review that? What are you, some kind of rich guy? You know, none of us can afford that.”

But that’s not the point. The point is this thing is going to wipe out plasma and LCD. It is. And better to know that now. Better to know that this was the moment when the next generation screen technology debuted.

 

Recorded on May 15, 2008

There's one called Sony.

What if all humanity had to do to save itself was listen?

By working together, and learning from one another, we can build better systems.

Videos
  • Many of the things that we experience, are our imagination manifesting into this physical realm, avers artist Dustin Yellin.
  • People need to completely rethink the way they work together, and learn from one another, that they they can build better systems. If not, things may get "really dark" soon.
  • The first step to enabling cooperation is figuring out where the common ground is. Through this method, despite contrary beliefs, we may be able to find some degree of peace.

10 excerpts from Marcus Aurelius' 'Meditations' to unlock your inner Stoic

Great ideas in philosophy often come in dense packages. Then there is where the work of Marcus Aurelius.

(Getty Images)
Personal Growth
  • Meditations is a collection of the philosophical ideas of the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.
  • Written as a series of notes to himself, the book is much more readable than the dry philosophy most people are used to.
  • The advice he gave to himself 2,000 years ago is increasingly applicable in our hectic, stressed-out lives.
Keep reading Show less

Where do atoms come from? Billions of years of cosmic fireworks.

The periodic table was a lot simpler at the beginning of the universe.

Videos
  • Michelle Thaller's "absolute favorite fact in the universe" is that we are made of dead stars.
  • The Big Bang, when it went off, produced basically three elements: hydrogen, helium, and lithium. Every atom more complex had to be formed inside a star. Over time, stars such as the sun produce things like carbon and oxygen.
  • They don't really get much more far off the periodic table than that. If you want to go any farther than the element iron, then you actually need a very violent explosion, a supernova explosion.