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Chris Hadfield
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Nina DiSesa: What inspired you to write?

Question: What inspired you to write “Seducing the Boys Club?”

Nina DiSesa: Well I wrote the book because I wanted to reach more women with women are very frustrated when they can’t get where they want to go over if they feel they have being bored in the work place and I wrote the book so I couldn’t reach more women, more frustrated women and try and keep them in the work force. I don’t really want to convince women to not to stay home and take care of their families of that’s what they wanted to do. I applaud them for that, but I also applaud the women who are trying to both who are trying to have a family and also get as far as they want to go and their jobs and I thought the book would help them. I thought writing here with the sense of humor would help them, get through it and keeping like a swift page turning read would be better for them and I tried not to not make it ponder is work of do’s and don’ts because an advertising I learn that if you have to entertain people in order to get them to remember, what you want them to remember and that’s how I tried to write the book and that’s why you see phrases in there like the art of and flirting with integrity is not much of that but that’s what pops out, there is a lot of information and there about how women and men can work better with each other so, I mean I just thought it was time to for somebody to write a book like that.

 

DiSesa says she wanted to reach women.

How often do vaccine trials hit paydirt?

Vaccines find more success in development than any other kind of drug, but have been relatively neglected in recent decades.

Pedro Vilela/Getty Images
Surprising Science

Vaccines are more likely to get through clinical trials than any other type of drug — but have been given relatively little pharmaceutical industry support during the last two decades, according to a new study by MIT scholars.

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Leadership, diversity and personal finance in the COVID-19 era

Sallie Krawcheck and Bob Kulhan will be talking money, jobs, and how the pandemic will disproportionally affect women's finances.

Hints of the 4th dimension have been detected by physicists

What would it be like to experience the 4th dimension?

Two different experiments show hints of a 4th spatial dimension. Credit: Zilberberg Group / ETH Zürich
Technology & Innovation

Physicists have understood at least theoretically, that there may be higher dimensions, besides our normal three. The first clue came in 1905 when Einstein developed his theory of special relativity. Of course, by dimensions we’re talking about length, width, and height. Generally speaking, when we talk about a fourth dimension, it’s considered space-time. But here, physicists mean a spatial dimension beyond the normal three, not a parallel universe, as such dimensions are mistaken for in popular sci-fi shows.

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Consumer advocacy groups are mostly funded by Big Pharma, according to new research

An article in Journal of Bioethical Inquiry raises questions about the goal of these advocacy groups.

Image by Jukka Niittymaa / Pixabay
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Two-thirds of American consumer advocacy groups are funded by pharmaceutical companies.
  • The authors of an article in Journal of Bioethical Inquiry say this compromises their advocacy.
  • Groups like the National Alliance on Mental Illness act more like lobbyists than patient advocates.

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