Michael Porter On The value Of Student Leadership Positions

Michael Porter, the Harvard Business School strategy guru, talks about one significant influence in his educational career—a student leadership position that led to business school and his entrance into academia. His comments were taped on Sept. 21, 2009 during a panel discussion entitled "Reflections on Leadership for Social Change," part of the inauguration of Jim Yong Kim as 17th president of Dartmouth College.

Cockatoos teach each other the secrets of dumpster diving

Australian parrots have worked out how to open trash bins, and the trick is spreading across Sydney.

Surprising Science
  • If sharing learned knowledge is a form of culture, Australian cockatoos are one cultured bunch of birds.
  • A cockatoo trick for opening trash bins to get at food has been spreading rapidly through Sydney's neighborhoods.
  • But not all cockatoos open the bins; some just stay close to those that do.
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    Godzilla and mushroom clouds: How the first postwar nuclear tests made it to the silver screen

    The few seconds of nuclear explosion opening shots in Godzilla alone required more than 6.5 times the entire budget of the monster movie they ended up in.

    Culture & Religion

    As I sat in a darkened cinema in 1998, mesmerised and unnerved by the opening nuclear bomb explosions that framed the beginning of Roland Emmerich's Godzilla, it felt like I was watching the most expensive special effect in history.

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    Dogs know when people are lying

    A new study tested to what extent dogs can sense human deception.

    Credit: Adobe Stock / kozorog
    Surprising Science
  • A study of 260 dogs found that, in some cases, dogs can tell when people are lying.
  • The experiments involved giving dogs information about the location of food.
  • The majority of the dogs did not follow false suggestions when they knew humans were lying.
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    American imperialism: fat-shaming Uncle Sam

    Opponents of 19th-century American imperialism were not above body-shaming the personification of the U.S. government.

    Credit: Bill of Rights Institute / Public domain
    Strange Maps
    • In the years before 1900, the United States was experiencing a spectacular spurt of growth.
    • Not everyone approved: many feared continued expansionism would lead to American imperialism.
    • To illustrate the threat, Uncle Sam was depicted as dangerously or comically fat.
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