Making the John Adams Mini-series

David McCullough: Well I knew from the first time that I met Tom Hanks who produced the mini-series that it was going to be done right, because I could tell from his understanding of what I had written and from the other films that he had made or had been a performer in that he really cares about American history, and that he would do it right. I was then asked to come to meet with Kirk Ellis [phonetic] the screenwriter, and we began blocking things out, we are talking about scenes and things that could be perhaps left out things that absolutely had to be included and from that point on I was part of the process through the entire production and I never once felt that there weren’t sincerely interested in my point of view, my objections, my enthusiasm for what they were doing. I didn’t have my way with all decisions, nor did I expect to a movie is a different vehicle, a different medium from the book and they are not the same. What the author of a book really hopes and prays for is it the people doing it will interpret the book, the materials, the characters in the right way, and that’s happened here. I was asked by Tom Hanks again to go to the back log of the sets, the whole production facility it was set up outside of Richmond, Virginia to give a talk to all the people who are working on film, not just actors but people who are involved with scripts and props costumes the whole crew, and my message to them was you are only get have one chance to do this story, probably won't be done again, in the same way ever, and you have the chance to have more of an effect on how Americans feel, how what they know, what they understand, but how they feel, about that founding time, then has ever been done before, because the power of this medium, the power of film and of great acting and of magnificent cinematography is so infinitely beyond almost any other medium that we have and the numbers of people who will see it, that it could transform our national respect and understanding for where we began? How we began? And what are we all about? What do we believe? What is the bed rock faith that we call American, because this is where it started and these are the people who had articulated it and I felt all along that everybody working on that production really cared about it and I certainly found that both Laura and Paul had done the reading had thought about it, had put themselves into those other lives in a way that to me is a genius.

Recorded on: 3/3/08

McCullough knew he was in good hands with Tom Hanks.

Personal Growth

The life choices that had led me to be sitting in a booth underneath a banner that read “Ask a Philosopher" – at the entrance to the New York City subway at 57th and 8th – were perhaps random but inevitable.

Keep reading Show less

Knowing the stages of neurological development can make you a better parent

There are four main stages. Each has its own particular set of advancements and challenges. 

 

Jordan Bruner. Vimeo.
popular

Don't you wish you could predict your child's behavior with 100 percent accuracy? Any realistic parent knows it's an impossible daydream, but an appealing one nonetheless. Kids will always surprise you. There are so many factors that go into behavior, not to mention the fact that internal and external forces can sometimes make kids act out of character.

Keep reading Show less

'Self is not entirely lost in dementia,' argues new review

The assumption "that without memory, there can be no self" is wrong, say researchers.

Photo credit: Darren Hauck / Getty Images
Mind & Brain

In the past when scholars have reflected on the psychological impact of dementia they have frequently referred to the loss of the "self" in dramatic and devastating terms, using language such as the "unbecoming of the self" or the "disintegration" of the self. In a new review released as a preprint at PsyArXiv, an international team of psychologists led by Muireann Irish at the University of Sydney challenge this bleak picture which they attribute to the common, but mistaken, assumption "that without memory, there can be no self" (as encapsulated by the line from Hume: "Memory alone… 'tis to be considered… as the source of personal identity").

Keep reading Show less