Let Your Ideas Lead the Way

Question: What advice would you give to a girl who wants to be a physicist?

Melissa Franklin: I think it’s important to realize that the most interesting thing about you is what you are interested in. So, what you have to play up is perhaps your interests and follow your interests because that’s actually what’s interesting. That’s the only thing that is ever going to be interesting about you. And that can go a long way in physics, or in science. Just being able to follow your own ideas is really important. That’s not to be totally tied up with the idea of my idea, my idea, my idea, but just to follow in the direction of our own ideas. And honestly, there’s no point in being successful at physics if you can’t. I don’t know if that – I think that is a way to succeed actually, to have a vision.

Recorded on: October 21, 2009

Physicist Melissa Franklin recommends you avoid trying to control where your ideas take you—instead, let them do their own thing.

Related Articles

How power affects the way you behave — and the way you’re punished

We all live by society's invisible rules but for some groups, these rules are tighter than for others, says psychologist Michele Gelfand.

popular
  • Rules, whether they're visible or invisible, govern our behavior every day.
  • Different groups have different rules, and have different views on how strict those rules are.
  • Powerful and dominant social groups have more flexible rules where obeisance is less mandatory.
Keep reading Show less

Wider-faced politicians are seen as more corrupt

New research offers a tip for politicians who don’t want to be seen as corrupt: don’t get a big head.

Researchers at Caltech discovered that wide-faced politicians are seen as more corrupt. (Keystone/Getty Images)
popular
  • New research offers a tip for politicians who don't want to be seen as corrupt: don't get a big head.
  • A new study showed people photos of politicians and asked them to rate how corruptible each seemed.
  • The results were published this week in Psychological Science by researchers at Caltech.
Keep reading Show less
Playlists
Keep reading Show less