Leroy Chiao’s Advice for Aspiring Astronauts

 

Question: What's your advice for an aspiring astronaut?

Leroy Chiao: Well, my advice is to really follow your passion. I mean, study something that interests you, but also qualifies you to apply. As I said, NASA recruits from a wide variety of backgrounds, you have to have a Bachelor's degree, at least in science or engineering, but pick the field that you like. I know people who have applied to be an astronaut who ask me, well should I do this or should I do that. And I said, you know, it doesn't matter. The basic requirements are you have to be in good health, and you have to have a good heart, I mean in a technical way, not to be a kind person, well that helps. But, study something that you like and do well in it.

 Recorded on December 16, 2009

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