Justin Frankel's Workspace

Question: What do you drink while coding? (Question from \r\nRedditor kunjaan)
\r\n

\r\nJustin Frankel: I like coffee and I like English Breakfast Tea.  \r\nCoffee, I generally go Americano because it has America in the name, and\r\n no, not really.  And then I have some cream in it.  No sugar.  But I do\r\n cream and sugar in my English Breakfast Tea because that’s the way it’s\r\n meant to be.
\r\n
\r\nQuestion:
What does your workspace look like?
\r\n

\r\nJustin Frankel: Generally, I like a big desk.  I have keyboard \r\nwhich is the originally Microsoft Natural keyboards, which was from like\r\n 1996, I think.  They changed them after that and they have the arrow \r\nkeys that are an “X” I think, or are a cross, or a plus sign rather than\r\n an inverted “T”, and those ones are terrible.  But I have like three of\r\n the classic Microsoft Natural keyboards. 
\r\n
\r\nUsually like one big monitor is my preference at this point. I have a \r\nMAC next to it and I use software called Synergy, which lets you move \r\nyour mouse cursor from on one computer to a monitor on another computer,\r\n which is pretty helpful when you’re doing cross platforms. 
\r\n
\r\nQuestion:
Describe your work process.
\r\n

\r\nJustin Frankel: I think most of my work happens at home.  And it \r\nused to be the kind of thing where I’d work late at night. But in the \r\nlast few years, I’ve definitely found myself getting more done in the \r\nmornings as I try to get up in the mornings.  Which I think is healthier\r\n for me in general.  But yeah, I think there's a lot of... there’s a lot\r\n of not working but thinking about working and sort of having problems \r\nin your mind that you’re trying to figure out the solution for before \r\nyou go and type any of it.  There's a lot of typing things and then \r\nrealizing what you’re doing is stupid and then revert, and throwing it \r\nall away and I think that’s something that's very useful to be able to \r\ndo, is to try things and if they don’t work out to move on.
\r\n
\r\nQuestion:
Do you listen to music while coding? 

\r\n
\r\nJustin Frankel: I tend to listen to music.  I was reading \r\nsomething recently where they were talking about how music with lyrics \r\nwill affect people if you’re like... if kids are doing homework, it \r\ninterferes with reading and I would tend to agree with that, but I think\r\n code is different enough from reading that lyrics aren’t really a \r\nproblem.
\r\n
\r\nQuestion:
Do you ever procrastinate?
\r\n

\r\nJustin Frankel: Yes, it’s funny you should ask that really.  \r\nYeah, I think the right amount of procrastination is a good... a very \r\ngood quality because I think sometimes you’ll go and have an idea to do \r\nsomething and then do it and spend a lot of time on it and then release \r\nit and then you’ll be stuck with it and then you’re later on realize \r\nthat you should have don it a different way and now you’re stuck with \r\nthe current version.  It’s less of an issue if you just try something \r\nout and then don’t like put it into a released product, but when you \r\nactually release things, you end up having this pressure of not taking \r\naway things that people like.  And so procrastination is good for that. \r\n And also, I think if you really, really think things through it will \r\nsave you time in the end when you go to actually implement it.
\r\n
\r\nQuestion:
What do you have against llamas? (Question from Redditor \r\nFlySwat)

\r\n
\r\nWe shipped a default MP3 with one app for while that was "Winamp. It \r\nreally whips the llama’s ass."  And then there was also an Easter Egg \r\nwhere you could make the title bar show that.  And the origin of that \r\nis, someone emailed us way back when, and I think emailed my friend, Tom\r\n Pepper, who was... ran all of our web stuff and was very much \r\ninstrumental in creating all of these communities.  Someone emailed \r\nsaying, Winamp,  it whips the llama’s ass, and so it just kind of \r\nstuck.  And then it turned out later that it’s actually something that \r\nWesley Willis, who's I guess is a comedian or a musician, or it’s kind \r\nof complicated if you look him up... mostly musician, but it’s some that\r\n he would say in a song, I think. I think somebody had emailed that, \r\nquoting one of his songs and we just sort of liked it as far as what we \r\nstood for, I guess. 
\r\n
\r\nWell, llamas are very cute.  But, I don’t know, just, just kind of having\r\n some sort of identity and having it be a little weird.

Recorded on June 21, 2010
Interviewed by Jessica Liebman

The developer still writes code on a Microsoft Natural keyboard from the mid-'90s, usually with one big monitor. He also reveals what he's got against llamas.

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