John McCain: Should Iowa and NH stay at the head of the primary schedule?

John McCain: Absolutely. In 2000 when Delaware wanted to go ahead of New Hampshire, I said that I would even pull down the shades on Amtrak as I passed through Delaware. Look, Iowa caucuses are important; New Hampshire and I think South Carolina as well. New Hampshire has a unique role. The citizens of New Hampshire know that unique role. They examine the candidates. There’s no way you can buy New Hampshire with media. You can only retail politic it. You can only have the town hall meetings. You can stop at the cafes and the stores and shake hands with people. And that’s . . . that’s the unique aspect and beauty of the American political scene in New Hampshire. Recorded on: 11/20/07

The citizens of New Hampshire play a unique role.

Permafrost is melting 70 years earlier than expected in Arctic Canada

It's a "canary in the coalmine," said one climate scientist.


MARK RALSTON/Contributor
Surprising Science
  • A team of researchers discovered that permafrost in Northern Canada is melting at unusually fast rates.
  • This could causes dangerous and costly erosion, and it's likely speeding up climate change because thawing permafrost releases heat-trapping gasses into the atmosphere.
  • This week, Canada's House of Commons declared a national climate emergency.
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Has a black hole made of sound confirmed Hawking radiation?

One of Stephen Hawking's predictions seems to have been borne out in a man-made "black hole".

Image source: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Surprising Science
  • Stephen Hawking predicted virtual particles splitting in two from the gravitational pull of black holes.
  • Black holes, he also said, would eventually evaporate due to the absorption of negatively charged virtual particles.
  • A scientist has built a black hole analogue based on sound instead of light.
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Watch scientists melt a satellite part to save us from space junk

Not every part of a satellite burns up in reentry. Considering the growing number of satellites in orbital space, that's a big problem.

Technology & Innovation
  • Earth's orbital space is getting more crowded by the day.
  • The more satellites and space junk we put into orbit, the greater a risk that there could be a collision.
  • Not all materials burn up during reentry; that's why scientists need to stress test satellite parts to ensure that they won't become deadly falling objects.
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